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Buy/Rescue a Puppy/Adult??
  • ljowen123ljowen123
    Posts: 3105
    I've had a lot of people ask me whether they should buy a puppy or an adult dog or should they rescue - my answer used to always be rescue an adult, but I'm not sure that's my answer anymore.....

    Pros to buying a puppy:
    the cutest photos ever!
    being responsible for training and raising the pup "right"

    Cons to buying a puppy:
    housetraining
    crate training

    Pros to rescuing a puppy:
    the cutest photos ever!
    being responsible for training and raising the pup "right"
    getting a puppy out of the system

    Cons to rescuing a puppy:
    housetraining
    crate training
    not knowing likely genetic defects

    Pros to buying an adult:
    no housetraining
    no crate training
    insight into the dog's common behaviours
    health screening

    Cons to buying an adult:
    possibly having to retrain over bad habits
    possibly a lesser bond

    Pros to rescuing an adult:
    no housetraining
    no crate training (maybe)
    insight into the dog's common behaviours
    health screening
    getting a dog out of the system

    Cons to rescuing an adult
    possibly having to retrain over bad habits
    possibly a lesser bond

    I've decided that it all depends on where you are in your life as to whether you should buy or rescue. Rescue has inherent dangers - some of the dogs have been abused and have many issues - psychological or physical. It takes someone willing to go above & beyond to work with the dog and others to help this dog (sometimes it's a matter of realizing that this dog is never going to be just like someone else's perfect example of the breed).

    Purchasing a dog has just as many problems - there are no guarantees in life that your dog is going to be perfect. Even with the best of practices, sometimes there are pups that don't have a great temperament or form.

    So what does one do? One evaluates their life - honestly. One does a ton of research and procures the best fit for their family. Then, one finds a support group to help them when they come across a problem. One takes the advice given and looks to see if it fits the situation and, if so, uses the information. If not, they keep searching for a solution - knowing that at some point, they'll stumble across it.
    LJ - owned by Queen Jazz, a Shiba Inu, Atlanta, GA
    CSC_0144
  • I feel compelled to correct two things that as a rescuer of many adults, who had also raised breeder puppies and rescue puppies, I feel comfortable stating.

    1)knowing the parents of your dog does not make you less likely encounter genetic defects, at all.

    and

    2) the STRONGEST bonds i have had with dogs, have always been with my adult rescues. They do truly show a gratitude for the life they have been given. And there is nothing more rewarding than taking an abused dog with a crushed spirit and watching it learn to trust, play and love once more.
  • All I have to say is, Brody is the smartest, most easily bored, most sneaky pup I've ever raised. My sheltie and my mixed breed were NEVER this smart. Like a three year old that knows to hide behind the sofa to poop their pants, Brody is SMART. He has also shredded enough toilet paper to fill the Dallas Football Stadium.

    I CANNOT imagine not being home to raise him almost 24/7, I really really can't. I can't see him as a pup who could sit in a kennel 8hrs a day, it would kill him, or alter his spirit.

    I can see where an adult dog would be much easier, if they were trained and didn't have anxiety issues (my sis adopted a half starved dog from a stranger in a park that literally ate her luan doors. and sis had to have someone with her for the first 3m.)

    I know it's almost impossible to have someone home all day. But, I have to say that my husband and I work seperate shifts, and between us and the kids it's a rare occasion nobody's home or the dogs aren't with us. I think that's why I have really nice dogs that don't have a lot of issues.

    Best of luck, glad you are taking this seriously and considering all options,
    Becca
  • I've seen bonds either way. I really bonded with my aunt's akita mix Pepper. I helped her pick him out as a puppy from the pound.

    My other aunt and uncle rescued a dog from the city, Baby. I have no what idea what kind of dog she was, but she loved the whole family.

    I think that either way you go there's pros or cons. I feel that you really have to make the deciscion that's right for you. Just remember that if you get a puppy you can still be involved with rescue.
  • jennajenna
    Posts: 154
    Speaking from experience with both puppies and rescued adults, I can assure you the bond happens with the right dog, regardless of what age the dog (or the person) is when you meet.

    What I really want to add to this conversation though is that although true rescue does always have possible risk/dangers as the original poster stated, adopting a rescued dog does NOT. If you adopt a rescued dog from an organization that fosters their dogs, you will know exactly what you are getting and you can make an informed decision. Plus, adopting from one of these groups is every bit as good as rescuing directly from a shelter - possibly better - because as soon as you adopt that dog and free up a foster home, the group is going to go out and rescue another dog to take it's place. Groups that do fostering right will match up fosters with homes that can meet their training, health and behavior needs and make them the best adoption candidate they can be.
    jenna -> founder of nyc shiba rescue, inc.
    snickers -> master of shiba mind control
    jennaandsnickers.com
  • ljowen123ljowen123
    Posts: 3105
    Excellent points! I put possibly on the bonding part because while I feel Jazz and I have a great bond, I can't say that for the all the people I know that have rescued an adult. Without a doubt, Jazz was the perfect dog for me! There are times that I wish I had gotten her as a puppy instead of a 4 year old. I'd like to think that some of the issues that she has now, she wouldn't have had if I'd had her as a puppy. On the flip side of that argument is - would we have the bond that we have now if she didn't have those issues? It's an answer I don't know and one that can never be answered since we can't rewrite our past.
    LJ - owned by Queen Jazz, a Shiba Inu, Atlanta, GA
    CSC_0144
  • CaliaCalia
    Posts: 3664
    I think, whether puppy or adult, bought or rescued, that bond would not be if there isn't an effort to make it. My sister got her schipperke as a puppy and 7 years later he still prefers my mom over her. Yeah she worked with him and trained and housebroke him, but she didn't really do to many activities with him that really made him happy. Most of her 'activities' with him was her holding him like a stuffed animal while she watch tv, surfed the web, or other lazy activity. My mom on the other hand, took him to the neighbors house and fed him bits of steak and snuggled with him when he wanted to. She did more activities with him that made him happy than bore him, and if he was give the choice, he would choose mom over sister everytime.
    image
  • We rescued T as an adult and he bonded with us SO much. I think it was the gratitude like one of the other posts noted. Also the fact that we absolutely LOVED him to death the moment we laid eyes on him. Sadie, my mom's shiba was purchased from a breeder as a pup and she is much more independent and less needy. But we love them both.
  • santuzzasantuzza
    Posts: 572
    I can't speak for other's and the situations they find themselves in, but for my own lifestyle, an adult rescue was THE BEST CHOICE I could've made. Even though I would've loved to have gotten to see Tosca as a puppy, and play with her, and enjoy all the shiba puppy cuteness, I'm really grateful for the time I have with her now - no matter how much time that turns out to be. I can't imagine life without my adult rescue and I don't want to.
  • slhr35slhr35
    Posts: 14
    Getting a small puppy and a 7 month old rescue was a good choice for me and my family.

    We have a 19 month old shiba thats been with us since she was 10 weeks old, her name is Mollie, in our eyes she`s perfect. Never heard the shiba scream from her, and we have only heard her bark 4 times, we do wish she was a little more vocal, but shes happy, feisty, healthy, funny and full of energy. We also have a 15 month old shiba that we brought home from a shelter 8 months ago. From the moment I looked at her I wanted to bring her home with us, so I filled out an application and waited for a phone call. I was afraid that they wouldn`t let us adopt her because they said she didn`t seem to like other dogs, they said she growled and nipped at the other animals at the shelter, they wanted her to go to someone who had no other pets. Fortunately for me my husband wasn`t going to take no for an answer, he called the shelter and talked to a lady who decided to let both shibas spend some time with each other to see how they behaved, there were no problems, no nipping or growling, they liked each other so they let us adopt her. Her name is Sadie. She does have some issues but shes is getting better, She is very afraid of men, a few weeks went by before she would go near my husband, now he`s her favorite family member, but she doesn`t care for other men. She was also distant, and didn`t want to be in the same room with us unless she needed something, now shes a lot more social with us, and she likes to be petted and hugged.
    She still isn`t comfortable with other people, she seems stresses when we have visitors, and prefers to go outside or hide in one of the bedrooms until they leave.
    House training was a nightmare. She was terrified when I caught her peeing on the floor but she wouldnt run from me, so I gently picked her up and took her outside, thats what I did everytime she had an accident, she is now housetrained. Shes a wonderful girl and we have never regreted adopting her, but the thing that still bothers me is she doesn`t seem as feistly and happy go lucky as Mollie is, and even though we try she just doesn`t seem to know how to play or maybe its just that she doesen`t have much of an interest. Is this just a difference in their personalities or is it the things she went through before she lived with us?
    Another big difference between them is Sadie is very vocal. When we come home after leaving her even for a short period of time we hear the shiba scream. She also barks at any strangers that come close to our fence.

    And if anyone had any advice as to how I can get Sadie to stop chewing holes in my quilts I would be forever grateful.
  • lol Katsu destroys our comforters too! I'm pretty sure it's out of boredom and the fact that she's not even 11 months old yet. So we play with her even more now to keep her mind occupied, give her challenging toys, and close the bedroom door. We still have to watch her though, she's a sneaky little chewing ninja.
  • About Sadie's lack of interest in playing I would offer some advice based on our experience with Triton. We rescued him at age 3 and he was pretty afraid at first. Did not and would not even touch a toy for at least 6 months and then when he did, it was very tentative. Now 2 years later he is a completely different dog. Loves his stuffed animals, carries them around, plays like crazy. I would suggest making the toys available to Sadie but not push her to play. Maybe after a while when she sees Mollie playing she might feel safe enough to join in!
  • slhr35slhr35
    Posts: 14
    Thanks for the advice.

    She does see us playing with Mollie and she looks like she wants to join in but just doesn`t quite know how. We do try to include her but we don`t want to push her either. I do think I forgot to say that she does play with Mollie a lot, it`s just us that she doesn`t want to play with to much. As for stuffed toys or any kind of toy, Sadie just wants to rip them apart, she even destroyed two kongs, Poor Mollie loves her toys, she just doesn`t get to keep them for very long.

    Again thanks for the advice.

    Joe&Dawn I looked at the pictures of your shibas they are beautiful.
  • hummm.....well oddly enough I found that most Shibas and Jindos house train pretty quickly. They may have a high prey drive and often a soft toy frenzy so tearing the toys apart to pull out stuffing is common. Expect "destructo" with most Spitizies in the toy, pillow or plushy category.

    Generally as far as bonding, I would say most rescues have a very strong bond with their new families. It takes time to build like any relationship.
    Actually Puppies are the same way.... it can take a year for a puppy to get a clue about what they are doing (coordination of physical with mental) and the world & people in it.

    It is up to the new owners to bring out the best in each animal regardless of where it comes from. In fact many dogs develop behavior issues over their life time even in a consistent stable environment. It is work we put into them through quality interaction and or training that reduces those little things that can develop into bigger issues. Anything to do with living beings flexes in terms of psychology. Similar to kids.... each usually has a bratty phase or other behavioral quirks based on their life stage and how as families we interact.

    In regard to health, that is not iron clad either. Genetics are an uncertain thing overall. There might be a higher chance of getting better health from a quality breeder, but some rescues have had no problems at all...go figure. With mammals in general there isn't a guarantee there won't be something that comes along in the aging process.... Not justifying just pointing out the reality.

    I think the most important thing you can do is plan and think carefully about what you can provide overall for the individual you are considering in bringing in as part of the family. Really evaluate and consider carefully the relationship you will have with the individuals that have provided you with the opportunity to purchase or adopt. A lot of research pre-purchase can give you a better idea what to expect.( I am sure this is repeated many times over... Avoid mass consumerism since it counts on impulsive decision making.... If you have to ask how much something costs or what the possible health concerns are for a breed or veterinary care needs AFTER THE FACT then obviously there wasn't much thought put into acquiring the pet.)

    Snf
  • phipsphips
    Posts: 106
    This is the perfect thread that I've been looking to post this in.

    Due to my personal circumstances and research, a rescue is the way I'm going.
    However, I have some serious concerns. Mainly that I may have to retrain bad habits, the dog may have been abused and therefore scarred for life, and that I won't be able to create as good of a bond with it as if I had gotten it as a pup. Also, at 4 years old or something, our time together will have already been cut short by 4 years =[ .

    I know many above said that they have great bonds with their rescues and that a bond will be made regardless of purchase or rescue if the bond has reason to be made. Sounds very true. I'm still worried though.
    And I guess I would have a chance of figuring out if the dog was abused and had bad habits from the rescuer prior to rescuing it.

    I've only ever rescued cats and cats are pretty aloof and do their own thing so rescuing "man's best friend" seems like an entirely different task.


    I guess my question is this: is there really that much of a difference between rescuing a 1 yr old (if you can even find one), a 2 yr old, or a 3 yr old?
    Also, is it really hard to rename them at such an age?

    Thanks guys.
    Sunny: 6/Male/Red Sesame
    Post edited by phips at 2012-06-03 13:34:10
  • curlytailscurlytails
    Posts: 2779
    Hi phips,

    I only have anecdotal experience to answer your questions, but I've found that in adopting my 5-year-old-ish Basenji (she's now 7-year-oldish), I don't dwell too much on the years we "lost" together (given also that the majority of Basenjis I have heard of dying from natural causes have been extremely long-lived!). She wasn't so hard to rename. We've bonded pretty strongly. Though it took some time for her to come out of her shell, the effect was pretty powerful when she began to emerge as a happy, healthy, playful adult -- knowing what little I did about her past, and how shut down she was when she first arrived.

    Given what you describe, possibly a prior traumatic abuse case may not make the ideal pet for a first rescue if you're not able to commit to long-term behavioral modification. But I honestly don't think that most rescues were previously abused. Perhaps they've been bounced around from home to home with families that were unable to commit to them (as was the case with my girl), or somewhat psychologically shaken from their time at a shelter (Shibas aren't known for doing well or behaving ideally in such environments). Mostly, they're confused and a little uncertain... but far from "scarred for life." And as I mentioned in another post, dogs are very adaptable. Food, physical comfort, and mental stimulation work their magic over time with the vast majority of dogs -- rescue or otherwise.

    My suggestion would be to work with a rescue organization with fosters that will be able to give you details about how the dog's personality has developed in a *home* environment. Even if they don't have information about whether or not a dog was abused in the past, they'll be able to tell you what day-to-day life might be like with a dog you're considering.

    Good luck in your search!
    image
    Bowdu 寶肚 (Shiba) and Bowpi 寶媲 (Basenji) with M.C.
    Post edited by curlytails at 2012-06-03 14:37:23
  • RyanRyan
    Posts: 293
    Curly- both of our/my old family basenjis saw 15+!

    I am pro rescue, Bella is only pedigree as we don't have many Shibas needing homes over here!
    We will probably only get a second if/when a rescue comes up...
    Bella (Sherae Aka Akicho) | F | Born 27/1/2012
    Suki (Aust. Ch. Betlin Takaisuki) | M | Born 03/02/2005, adopted 10/09/2012
  • curlytailscurlytails
    Posts: 2779
    @Ryan, glad to hear it. =) And I'm always impressed by the people who approach me and say things like, "We used to have a Basenji who lived to be 16/17..."

    And the same thing happens with Shibas too. I make a note to remember the ages of long-lived Shibas that others have told me about, and so far the oldest one that I have *heard* of was also about 16 years old. On average, they're not that long-lived, but they CAN be. To me, a 4 ~ 7 year old Shiba is still very much in her "prime."

    But you know, there are a lot of advantages even to rescuing a senior dog. I'd like to hope that when I myself am older and slower, there will still be a place for adopted dogs at my side -- but certainly not puppies or young dogs if I myself am not in the position to take care of them for another dozen years. Our local shelter, for example, has a "seniors for seniors" program where anyone aged 60+ can adopt a 6+ year old dog either for free or at a greatly reduced fee.

    And many rescues also have adoption fees tiered according to age of the dogs. Ultimately, that initial cost probably won't factor *too* much into your decision, but it *can* be significant.
    image
    Bowdu 寶肚 (Shiba) and Bowpi 寶媲 (Basenji) with M.C.
  • SayaSaya
    Posts: 6678
    A rescued adult can be renamed just takes a little work.

    My mom's next dog will most likely be rescue or she might never get another dog.. She gets burnt out with Bella at times.. Dad had to have her and he never walks her or helps he hinder Bella more then anything. haha

    Most my parent's dog's been from news paper ads.. Bella was from kijiji.

    I begged dad to be patient and look for a boxer breeder that worked with their dogs and stuff, but nope he had to have a puppy right now!

    Mom not getting any younger so she plans get her next dog as rescue so she can find one with right personality. She likes boxers, but she likes Saya too.

    Who knows what breed she'd pick.

    I might one day adopt a shiba puppy or adult doesn't matter long as personality is good.
    Photobucket
    Nicole, 5year old Bella(Boxer), and 4year old Saya(Shiba inu)
  • RyanRyan
    Posts: 293
    @curlytails the oldest shiba on record is 26, at the time of its death it was also the oldest living dog in the world at the time!
    Bella (Sherae Aka Akicho) | F | Born 27/1/2012
    Suki (Aust. Ch. Betlin Takaisuki) | M | Born 03/02/2005, adopted 10/09/2012
  • curlytailscurlytails
    Posts: 2779
    @Ryan, Pusuke the Shiba was described as a mix, so there may be some hybrid vigor to account for her long-livedness. Regardless, she was quite an aberration for any breed! By "heard" of, I just mean people who have spoken to me about Shibas that they have had direct experience with...

    On the subject of Shibas and longevity, I occasionally check out The Shiba Veteran Top 50 list as maintained by Geert Jan Wagemans. For the sake of accuracy/verification, it's based on registered Shibas, though I think a lot of us have certainly encountered Shibas who were old enough to compete with that list.

    But I think it does put into perspective just what "old" or "too old" means when we're talking about Shibas. A 5-year-old Shiba should have the vast majority of its life ahead of him, to say nothing of the 3-year-old, the 2-year-old... As much as I want my loved pets to live forever, I *will* outlive them, at least if all goes as intended... I don't think I'll ever be prepared for the end, whether I've had two months or an entire lifetime with a pet.

    So bringing us back to the pros and cons? Maybe you can only lose so many pets in a lifetime before your personal heartbreak quota is maxed out. And if you adopt older pets, you're closer to reaching that threshold, whatever that may be for you. Depending on how one deals with pet loss, that can be a pretty big con.
    image
    Bowdu 寶肚 (Shiba) and Bowpi 寶媲 (Basenji) with M.C.
  • phipsphips
    Posts: 106
    so i filled out two adoption forms
    shibainurescue.org
    and
    savingshibasinc.com

    so i guess its now just waiting time....for months most likely. anyone able to clue me in on what happens next and/or what i should do next?

    also, im a bit worried that my lack of an answer for "vet reference" could be detrimental. i have never owned a dog myself so i don't have a vet reference.
    Sunny: 6/Male/Red Sesame
  • INU RYUUINU RYUU
    Posts: 1507
    You can add a vet that you are planning to use. Possiblty introduce yourself to the vet and his staff.
    犬竜
  • RyanRyan
    Posts: 293
    What are people's thoughts on a 7yo rescue? Little older than some would say is ideal, but should be able to keep up with a puppy in play and hiking, right?
    Bella (Sherae Aka Akicho) | F | Born 27/1/2012
    Suki (Aust. Ch. Betlin Takaisuki) | M | Born 03/02/2005, adopted 10/09/2012
  • RhondabeeRhondabee
    Posts: 175
    @Ryan: I think a 7 year old can still be very playful and active, but it depends on the individual dog, too. My Kenji will be 14 this year and he still loves going on walks and loves playing fetch and playing with toys. He has slowed down, but he really doesn't act that old. Shibas can easily live to 15-16 years, so a 7 year old shiba is really not that old.
  • lindsaytlindsayt
    Posts: 4786
    I enjoy my dogs more at 4 and 5 than I did when they were younger.
    "Common sense isn't so common"
    photo c5d87957-61b6-48af-a440-4187cbfc861b_zps88ccdf88.jpg
  • @phips

    I'm not with Saving Shibas Inc in SoCal, but I am with SIRTx and talk with SaShi all the time as the people who run that rescue are good friends of ours. Basically what is next is if they think your home is good based on the application, they try to match you up with one of their rescues (after a home check, I believe) You will be able to meet them and go home on a trial adoption if all goes according to plan. :) As far as lack of vet reference, that's not something to take you app out of the running, but like Inu Ryuu said one you plan on going to (especially if you have owned any other pet before), a friend who has dogs or someone who can attest to if you could take care of a dog would be something preferable to blank.

    How we do it at SIRTx to give you a better guideline (I am not 100% how SaShi do it, but they are similar to us) is on our website:

    The Shiba Inu Rescue of Texas Adoption Process:

    -Submit an application. Feel free to indicate in the application which currently available Shiba Inu you are most interested in.

    -We take in all applications and select homes we believe to be suitable for a Shiba Inu.
    If we feel the applicant would be a great adoptive home, we check references and set up a home check with one of our volunteers to visit the applicant's home. A home check is a way to get to know the applicant on a more personal level, get a feel for their home and living conditions, and address any concerns between both parties. Generally, these visits don't take longer than an hour. Please keep in mind that both apartment renters and home owners are welcome!

    -After approval of the home, a meeting is set up with the Shiba Inu that fits the adopters' needs best. This step is especially crucial for applicants with existing pets or children.

    -A week long trial adoption period follows, where the applicant signs the adoption application and pays the adoption fee, which Shiba Inu Rescue of Texas will not deposit for the duration of the trial period.

    -Once the trial period is over, the applicant has the choice of keeping their new Shiba buddy and making the adoption final, or deciding the situation will not work out. In the event that the adoption isn't going to work, the applicant can return the dog to Shiba Inu Rescue of Texas at no penalty, and the adoption fee will be returned to the applicant.

    -------

    Obviously, I love rescue. My own was adopted as a rescue at just under 1.5 years and I consider myself lucky to have found one so young, as I was thinking 3-5 years old, which would have been great, too, and our average age of intake. My dog and I are pretty close and I don't feel like it would have been more had I had him as a puppy. So many great dogs come through rescue, and I can count the number of times on my hand in the last three years I've volunteered that we ever thought the dogs were abused before (or not necessarily abused, just mishandled and misunderstood. It's an extremely low number, and even then we aren't completely convinced.) Most of our dogs are owner surrenders or strays and some have even gone on to get CGC and do therapy. :) The older ones are always nice since they are still feisty and energetic, always willing to tug on a toy or jog around the block, but more content to watch TV with you in the evenings than the younger ones we foster.

    That said, I love puppies. I am currently trying to research and reach out to some breeders myself for a puppy. I still rescue. Mostly I want a different challenge and I haven't found the next keeper in the fosters I've had (well, I did, but my president stole her from me ;))
  • DakotaRose42DakotaRose42
    Posts: 152
    I'll just add my 2 cents in here... So I adopted both mine at 9 months. I consider them both rescue's because I was saving them both for icky situations.

    I AM READY FOR A PUPPY! :D Although, I am sooooo glad I was able to bring these 2 shiba's into my life, and wouldn't trade them for the world! I am ready for the teething, crate training and the first's like sitting, and laying and come... etc.

    My situation when I adopted them was hectic, when I 1st got Shiba my kids were 13,11 and 7! They were ready for walking and feeding a dog, but certainly not training one. Myself having a full time job, plus the kids; rescuing was the only way to go for us.
    Now I am sending one off to college and the other will follow in 2 years, I think that will be the perfect time to get a puppy, hopefully it will also help with my "Empty Nest Syndrome" I am already starting to get! So, I am putting in the ground work now, to explore breeders and such, so when that time comes, it will be a smooth transition from College Student to puppy! Knowing me, I will end up with a rescue puppy... I am addicted to saving Shiba's! Haha!
    ~Steph and Wade~ Proudly owned by: Shiba and Lyla
    http://luv4shiba.tumblr.com/
  • sunyatasunyata
    Posts: 8582
    I would just like to remind everyone that buying a puppy (or even an adult dog) from a pet store, BYB, or puppy mill is NOT rescuing. No matter how bad the situation happens to be, by buying the dog, you are perpetuating the problem and funding bad/unethical breeding practices.

    If you want to rescue, please adopt from a reputable rescue or shelter or consider re-homing a dog from Craigslist whose owner refuses to contact a rescue organization.
    Bella 2Mountains 2Nola 2
    Casey, with Bella and Nola, hanging out in the mountains of Virginia.
    I Wander, I Ride
  • phipsphips
    Posts: 106
    @paisleyfox,

    thanks for the input. it was helpful and most welcome.

    i know you said your process might be different but i was just curious about how you guys go about that first step that you mentioned: the determining if the applicant is a suitable prospective owner before getting up a home visit. And what the time frame is like (i know this varies for all orgs but I'm just curious).

    Im in no real rush but i'd also at least like something that says "your application is under review" or w/e so i know it has been received and/or looked at (at least briefly). so, i asked about the time frame so i kinda can get some sort of idea about when i might possibly expect a follow up email.

    thanks!
    Sunny: 6/Male/Red Sesame
  • Honestly, it varies. I know that's not very helpful, but it all depends on what free time the people in the rescue have, and know that you could be competing for a dog in high demand for the rescue. Basically we all have full time jobs and our own families etc that we have in addition to running a rescue (jobs help pay for all those vet bills and tanks of gas, afterall!)

    If you haven't heard anything in a week, you can probably send them an email asking if there is anything else you need to do for them in terms of your application. I know sometimes we don't reply to applications right away, and I know it can be nerve wracking for the applicant (I was one!) but know we aren't ignoring you out of spite. ;) We used to not contact applicants until we had a dog for them, and my rescue has since changed that, but I'm sure SaShi Inc has seen your application, but the two running it have been busy for professional and personal reasons lately.
  • phipsphips
    Posts: 106
    thanks
    Sunny: 6/Male/Red Sesame
  • phipsphips
    Posts: 106
    so its been ~a week and a half and i haven't heard anything. obviously I'm not expecting them to have matched me with a rescue yet but i would like to at least know that my app has been received and is under review or something.....

    is a follow up email appropriate at this point?
    Sunny: 6/Male/Red Sesame
  • KyriannmKyriannm
    Posts: 34
    @phips Hi there, my husband and I adopted our shiba through a rescue and I have to say, we really have no regrets, other than we love him and spoil him rotten. However, we fostered to adopt, so the other option you might have is to foster first then adopt later!
  • phipsphips
    Posts: 106
    care to elaborate?
    Sunny: 6/Male/Red Sesame
  • What that is is you volunteer to foster a dog for a rescue. They generally pay for treatment and you follow their rules. If it works out, you get first dibs on adopting the dog (and still have to pay the adopt fee.) It's a great way to get to know the breed if you have never owned one before, and it really helps the rescues out with having another foster home.

    If you want you can send them an email asking about the status of your application. Right now they are in a lull of dogs, so I don't think they have any to adopt at the moment, but go ahead and give them a poke.
  • phipsphips
    Posts: 106
    well i guess its good that i did contact one of them as they were unaware that i had submitted an app for whatever reasons. cleared that up though.

    however, i was informed of a shiba that was brought into a semi-local animal shelter. does anyone know how things like that work? if no one claims the dog can i rescue it? or what?

    thanks.
    Sunny: 6/Male/Red Sesame
  • KyriannmKyriannm
    Posts: 34
    @phips You can still adopt the dog at the local shelter on your own. With the Shiba Rescue, they do an evaluation of the Shiba first before it goes into your home. It really is a matter of preference and your comfort level with the breed. When you adopt directly, the dog is part of your family immediately. You don't have a chance for their true personality to show until a certain length of time. If you foster first, you get to see their personality and also understand the temperament before you officially adopt.

    We decided to go with the Shiba Rescue because Shiba's can be a real handful, and each individual Shiba has their own distinct personality. We weighed the pros and cons and thought that with the Shiba Rescue assessing them, and us having the opportunity to foster, we get a chance to spend time with the Shiba and see if they fit into the family.

    I hope I didn't cause more confusion, but we ended up falling in love with our Shiba when we fostered. His true personality didn't shine until two weeks after we began fostering him.
  • phipsphips
    Posts: 106
    @kyriannm yeah, i see the difference here. with a rescue i could get more info and a chance to foster off the bat in order to get to know the dog first whereas with me rescuing directly from a shelter, i dont get this.

    however, i am still very optimistic but i will of course visit the shelter and ask alot of questions and see how it goes from there
    Sunny: 6/Male/Red Sesame

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