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Few questions- yes I have searched :) training, recall
  • RyanRyan
    Posts: 293
    Post edited by curlytails at 2012-12-12 22:55:48
  • LosechLosech
    Posts: 2516
    She's 13 weeks old. Don't expect much from her right now, she's still a baby.

    Yes, it will all get better with maturity, if you keep the training up. She will go through periods of getting worse and getting better (just like a toddler, or teenager) but if you stick through it and keep the training going, she'll be pretty good as an adult.
    My Shiba was terrible with all that as a pup but is very good about it now. He's almost two years old. He's very good off-leash now but not perfect, I don't ever expect him to be, but I got to that point by keeping the training going even though he came when I called him without treats. If you slack off, they will get "rusty" so constant training is a good thing to keep up.
    The "not coming when called" thing could almost be a Shiba breed trait. But keep working at it, and don't let her off-leash unless you are certain she will respond when you ask her to. Even then, Shibas are prone to darting off when they know they are free, so it's always a gamble with them. (Even in the house, they are crafty little buggers.)

    I would say that obedience is definitely a good thing to have/do. If you can't get your Shiba's attention, how do you expect them to come when called? Like I said above, she will get better as she gets older and with plenty of good fun training. Take a couple classes too, those are always helpful in some way or another.
    Post edited by Losech at 2012-04-24 07:34:39
  • konpeitokonpeito
    Posts: 281
  • XabiXabi
    Posts: 432
  • jjlcjjlc
    Posts: 66
    First off, your pup is young and assuming you got it as 8wks, has not had enough time to really bond with you or see you as much more than a food and play dispenser.

    With that said, I would not count on age and maturity to improve or fix anything unless you also plan to invest the time needed to make it so. If that's your mindset the dog will only learn whatever she needs to do to get what she wants. Lets be honest, if she's only doing these tricks "when she wants too" then she's not really trained so don't expect age to change that much.

    So my answer is yes, you need obedience training. Unless you've trained dogs previously, you just don't know what you don't know. Find a trainer in your area who teaches reward based obedience/behavior training and use that as your framework for all the cute tricks. Once you have that framework and you stick to it, everything is training for both you and the dog.
    Post edited by jjlc at 2012-04-24 09:07:43
  • deerparkdeerpark
    Posts: 237
    Post edited by deerpark at 2012-04-24 09:24:01
  • lindsaytlindsayt
    Posts: 4786
  • RyanRyan
    Posts: 293
  • JuniJuni
    Posts: 1269
    Juni didn't understand half of those commands at that age, don't worry!
    But I would like to encourage you to be very playful when you train her, at least Juni learns a lot quicker that way, and also not only focus on recall but do things so she learns that it pays off to be around you and keep an eye on you. Hide and reward generously when she finds you, pretend you found something interesting so she'll come over and let there be treats or fun toys in the grass or on a tree branch for example. If she doesn't respond to your recall command, don't use it as the meaning of the word will wear off. Start using it when she starts coming to you more and more in the play situations.

    I also find that it is good to have a "stop" command, it usually works better in serious situations too as a recall involves a lot more actions from the dog's side (she must stop, then turn around probably, then run towards me) = too many decisions to make when all her instincts are telling her to run after that exciting rabbit/cat/deer/ you name it.

    I always said stop without realizing at first that it was a good command, when she got entangled around a tree or something so it was easy to understand a stop really means she can't go anywhere. I throw in a stop every now and then when we walk or play and then give a "go ahead" command when she's given me eye contact. We also work very hard with this when we spot prey, she has to stop, if she's standing still she's allowed to look at the animal, after she's given me eye contact I usually give her a goahead to move forward a bit more (on a leash) so that stop doesn't necessary means that all the fun stops, it just means she needs to check with me. Or I give her a recall if I feel she's losing interest in the animal and is more likely to run back to me, then I reward VERY generously with treats or games.

    I enjoy teaching Juni "silly" tricks too, mainly because it's an activity we do together and enjoy, that hopefully makes her think I'm fun to be around and there's no pressure on her getting everything right.
  • KimbaKimba
    Posts: 46
    One-year-old Rocco was such a lovely, perfect, well-behaved baby (from 8 weeks until about 6-8 months old), but then has become an increasingly disobedient and very naughty/mischievious adolescent. And I'm increasingly desperately hoping that it's just a stage that he will soon grow out of.
  • RyanRyan
    Posts: 293
  • BootzBootz
    Posts: 3495
  • RyanRyan
    Posts: 293
  • BootzBootz
    Posts: 3495
    "she doesn't want to come over" LOL. Bootz USE to be like that. As a puppy and through her rebellious adolescence stage. I was consistent, reinforce training and BAM. Before i realize it she had reliable recall. Bootz was very distant from the start, at 2 months. She became affectionate around 9 months, which is about the time her recall training paid off. I think our bond had something to do with her recall. But maybe that is just me over thinking it.

    Regarding the partner thing. Same thing happens with me and my partner. But I notice the difference in behavior is due to tone of voice, body language, and vibe of my partner. Also i'm the primary caretaker XD.
  • RyanRyan
    Posts: 293
  • @Ryan
    "Has anyone else found that their Shiba is more consistent/better behaved for themselves and not their partner? eg; she responds better to my [consistent] training, and my partner seems to have issues?-"

    I'd say as a general rule that is probably true of Umi - my wife has sort of jokingly complained that Umi listens to me but not her. But I'm a lot stricter on her than my wife too, which may make a difference.

    Incidentally, how's life in Perth with Bella? We walk Umi at least once a day and just get absolutely bombarded with questions about her - it's a non-stop stream of Q&A, which is cool, I don't mind. My wife thinks it pretty funny though, because for her, Shiba's aren't such a big deal (Japanese).
  • RyanRyan
    Posts: 293
  • BootzBootz
    Posts: 3495
    @Ryan. Ahahahah. That is what I tell all my single male friends to do. Get ME another Shiba puppy, and they can borrow it to get girls! My boyfriend and I stopped by the pet store the other day and girls were going up to him to asking questions about Bootz. Honestly, i'm the type of person who doesn't like to be bothered. So I just walked away and rolled my eyes at my boyfriend. He enjoys the attention as much as Bootz does.
    Post edited by Bootz at 2012-04-27 11:24:18
  • RyanRyan
    Posts: 293
  • RyuDragonRyuDragon
    Posts: 319
    Regarding the whole listens to one person and not the other issue, dogs take their cues from those who provide for them (food, water, etc.). My fiance and I each feed Ryu one meal, she does breakfast and I do dinner. Even though she was home with him all day while I was at work Ryu still listens to both of us. He is a little more affectionate towards her sometimes, but he listens to both of us equally. It might take some time for the association to develop, but I definitely recommend this for couples with a dog.
  • Ryan I was in Leederville yesterday having breakfast at Kailis's and a whole troup of female Uni student's walked by, half of them stopping to pat the dog and coo over her. Had I known THAT when I was 20, well......
  • RyanRyan
    Posts: 293
  • Yep, we're in Mount Hawthorn.
  • RyanRyan
    Posts: 293
  • RyanRyan
    Posts: 293
  • Sarah_Jay12Sarah_Jay12
    Posts: 316
  • RyuDragonRyuDragon
    Posts: 319
    @Sarah_Jay12 its has worked very well for us so far (we have had Ryu for a little over 7 months now) . Good luck with your new puppy.

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