For all new members, please check out the thread New to the Forum? What to do and forum guidelines.
How to train your shiba to jog with you?
  • SakuSaku
    Posts: 372
    I would like to start jogging with my shibas. They both just turned one-year old. How should I train them to run with me? And what kind of gears (leash or harness or others) should I buy for them? Thanks!
    Saku & Mina's mom

    Saku & Mina
    Post edited by Saku at 2012-01-02 07:46:34
  • InoushiInoushi
    Posts: 555
    My shiba jogs with me, however I would not reccomend allowing them both to go with you at the same time. There is just too much that could happen that can cause them to get tangled or for tripping to occur. Both should be wearing a harness, especially during training. I don't use one with my boy anymore, but he does keep pace with me, infact his leash tends to be looser during a jog. Bring water with you. Also make sure you keep them on the grass, its better for their feet and joints. Its going to take a lot of trial and error. Treats can be a good way to keep them running next to you instead of ahead. However it takes a while to build up endurane. Shibas are sprinters so they tire out easy and don't like to run far distances. So stay mindful of them. also it may be a good idea to practice at night so there are not a lot of distractions.
  • CaliaCalia
    Posts: 3634
    Were you planning on having them jog next to you in heel position, or having them up front pulling you (canicross)?
    image
  • SakuSaku
    Posts: 372
    I was planning to jog with one shiba at a time. As far as in front of me or beside me, I prefer beside me on the grass as its better for thie joints. I have harness that clicks on the back ( we use for hiking and tracking), I wonder if its okay for jogging?
    Saku & Mina's mom

    Saku & Mina
    Post edited by Saku at 2012-01-02 10:59:06
  • LosechLosech
    Posts: 2516
    When I jog with my dogs, I don't use a collar. Jogging is more exciting and something that wouldn't set them off on a walk might on a jog or run, so I use a harness. I had a regular over-the-head type that you get at the pet store but now I use Ruff Wear harnesses.

    And, if a Shiba don't wanna run, they ain't gonna. I can't for the life of me get Conker to go much faster than a light trot (slower than my slow jog) on hard surfaces, so I usually don't bother. If I'm on a hiking trail though, he's got no speed limit.
  • Long distance running is not the best of ideas with a Shiba until older and you have determined that his hips and legs can take the wear. Many Shibas have knee or stifle issues. This can be ruled out with an orthopedic evaluation and x-ray. When you have the all clear to start, keep it to small sprints once he is beyond 18 months building to longer times at around 24 months of age. In the duration see if you can get loose leash walking down as that will help you with the jogging later on. Use of something like an "Comfort Flex Harness" that isn't tight is helpful for active movement.

    Snf
    Post edited by StaticNfuzz at 2012-01-02 12:25:53
  • EzyDog have a number of harnesses that look pretty awesome, we've got one on the way.

    They also had dual leads for a single handle if you want to walk / jog with both at once.

    I agree it's a matter of building up their staminar and also making sure they are "mature" enough that they won't cause themselves an injury.
  • Took my shiba running at 6 months. Started with a 1/4 mile and worked my way up to a mile with my shiba. Then it got cold. I plan on going a longer distance now that he is one.
  • RikkaRikka
    Posts: 1234
    Bumping this since I'm wanting to jog more with Sagan and have a slight issue regarding this.

    So, he does absolutely wonderful on the leash when I take him to go to the bathroom or walking somewhere. However, when I take him on a longer walk (30 minutes +) or jogging, he tends to get rather impatient and annoying. When the walk starts nearing to 25 minutes or so, he starts jumping on top of me, grabbing the leash and playing tug-o-war, attempting to pick every little thing off the ground, and generally being unpleasant and it forces me to go back home since the walk isn't fun anymore.

    Same goes with jogging. The first loop I did with jogging, he did great, but when I started on the second loop, he acted the same way: jumping on me and pulling on the leash. I ended up running back home since I couldn't continue with him acting like that.

    I went ahead and bought a Ruffwear backpack for him because a friend of mine was thinking that maybe he is under-stimulated on walks, so perhaps this can remedy it? I'm not sure. He also isn't thirsty or tired, since he isn't showing obvious signs, i.e. panting, tongue out, slowing down, or stopping completely.

    Any other Shibas act like this? :|
    image
    Lauren, living with a 2 y/o Shiba named after a scientist.
  • LosechLosech
    Posts: 2516
    Sounds like he's bored. Conker will start to "act out" on walks or jogs if I don't let him stop and sniff stuff every few minutes, or play a quick game of fetch/tug. On hikes he does whatever he pleases, within reason, and he's never obnoxious like that. So I attribute his annoying walk/jog behavior to simple doggy boredom. I'm doing what I want to, but he isn't, how fun is that?
  • redcattooredcattoo
    Posts: 1960
    I agree it sounds like doggie boredom. You may have to find ways to make the walk/jog more interesting to him.
  • RikkaRikka
    Posts: 1234
    Ah, okay. I'm a bit clueless as to why he'd get bored on jogging since he's actually moving beyond a walking pace, but meh. I'll try and think of ways to make a jog more interesting.

    Hopefully a backpack full of stuff will wear 'em out for long walks.
    image
    Lauren, living with a 2 y/o Shiba named after a scientist.
  • kumaDUDEkumaDUDE
    Posts: 1255
    Kuma does this with me @rikka , so what I started doing is change of pace when running or walking for a long period of time.
    Whenever we walk 30+ minutes I tell Kuma wait, then say jog time, then we jog, then tell him wait, and walk again. He does better than what he used to, and change of pace for me is good since I plan on playing basketball again
  • InuzooInuzoo
    Posts: 215
    I tried jogging with Zooey and the sound of my feet and the pace freaked her out. I didn't bother to keep it up with her. We walk fast..... Just the way she likes it. :)
  • BootzBootz
    Posts: 3131
    @kumaDUDE, HAHAHAH. Sorry that image made me laugh :(

    I keep it real with Bootz. We are both lazy. But we do ours walks lol. We would sprint up hill but both of us will slow down at the same time. Bootz has a habit of abruptly stopping when she sees something of interest. So I only jog with her when i'm at FF so she can keep her own pace and follow me offleash.

  • kumaDUDEkumaDUDE
    Posts: 1255
    Hahaha, I have to, I run out of breath before he does... Like an hour before him
  • redcattooredcattoo
    Posts: 1960
    I keep it interesting by changing my activity. I always use different routes, I change pace, I will zig zag out of the blue, I will turn around and head back towards where we just were for a little bit, I will sometimes just start walking backwards, sometimes I stop and do jumping jacks, ect, in essence my dogs never know what to expect so they stay interested. I also once and awhile carry a tug toy and pull it out so I can play with it hanging and still walk/jog/run or I grab a stick and throw it a few feet ahead for them to chase. I think a lot of it is if I just walk and I just walk the same way predictably I get as bored as the dogs.
  • TengaiTengai
    Posts: 273
    My dogs love coming out walking/running even biking. I usually do two at once. Start with one at a time, make sure they learn to stay at your side not weaving back and forth, then take together. I usually bike with them, not fast just quick enough to keep them trotting not galloping. It's great exercise for both you and them! I live in a residential area so my neighbors get a kick out of me road training the dogs. Just start slow and short, gradually increasing time. I usually do a couple runs around the neighborhood, about 2 miles at a time.
  • RikkaRikka
    Posts: 1234
    Cycling isn't an issue with Sagan because it's unpredictable and he enjoys it. I've been biking with him since he was much younger because both my partner and I are avid cyclists and wanted to bring him among trails when he was older.

    @redcattoo - I'll do that, then. I hadn't think of doing crazy patterns, but if it stops Sagan mauling my leg or playing with the leash, so be it. :P
    image
    Lauren, living with a 2 y/o Shiba named after a scientist.
  • redcattooredcattoo
    Posts: 1960
    @Rikka, doing the unpredictable will keep you interesting and you don't have to do it often. The neighbors I am sure get a kick out of it when I do weird things. In some ways I am lucky that my neighborhood while residential is fairly quiet and not heavy traffic so I can find many places to be weird. Also with the golf course I sometimes weave my way down the fairways running in erratic circles.

    I do use the leash at times as a controlled tug item to get out pent up energy for a minute or two and I let him carry a part of it in his mouth if he walks calmly. I only ask him to drop it if he has initiated a tug game instead of me or I need him to be walking calmly and he isn't. This is because like you he would get really annoying biting at the leash when he was younger, grabbing and jumping at me with it.

    Controlling how and when he can play with the leash seems to have taught him a level of control, but I also find the fact he does grab the leash helpful. He uses grabbing the leash as a way to communicate with me that he desires something (ie to go a certain direction or that he is bored), so it helps me to read him during the walk and adjust as needed.
  • I run at least 5 times a week with my shiba and min pin and the same time. My shiba can go up to 6 miles and the min pin is good with 3 miles. I run with them both at the same time and with collars. I carry a bag of treats with me to keep both of the interested and I tend to change my route every time just so there is new smells or something to look at. I've also trained my dogs to run on a treadmill when it's too cold outside or raining (the min pin doesn't like the rain). But no matter how they are feeling, as soon as my running shoes are in my hand, both dogs are at the door with that look "so where are we going this time!?!?"
  • Great thread! I was interested in doing the same, Hiiro is only 6 months right now so I haven't ran anything longer then around the block. I usually do that if I can't busy all day and cannot get his normal amount of walk in. I have also had him run next to me while I longboard around.

    I also would recommend the EzyDog Chest Plate Harness, thats what we use with great results!!!
  • I run with my two shibas. One is 13 months and the other is 9 months. It's great exercise for them. I use a harness (I recommend puppia) and a leash that allows you to walk/run with two dogs. It's great exercise for them and they usually run along the grass area in my neighborhood. They've gotten into the rhythm of things after a couple of tries. Our runs are usually up to 4 miles, once a week, and they love it. It honestly was trial and error for us. Goodluck! :)
  • Oh, I also recommend a shorter leash rather than the retractable ones. It keeps them from tugging and they don't get as distracted. I understand they are dogs and they have their needs of sniffing, so I'll give them the first 5 minutes of the run to sniff around. It usually helps cure their curiosity for sniffing everything.
  • RikkaRikka
    Posts: 1234
    I've never used, or liked, retractable leashes. I always use a 6" leash.
    image
    Lauren, living with a 2 y/o Shiba named after a scientist.
  • LosechLosech
    Posts: 2516
    A retractable leash would be a DISASTER with any of my dogs in an urban setting. Rural, or hiking? Fine, but they are usually off-leash in those places anyways so why bother. I find them to be incredibly crappy in both design and quality, and have been injured more than I'd like by other people's misuse of them. Also, they are actually illegal in my town. Leashes longer than 8 feet for that matter.
  • knnwangknnwang
    Posts: 587
    I once had a cat my sister owned that would dart from point to point ie. Brush and trees on jogs. To bad they are considered dogs.
  • I've taken my shiba out on runs since he was 8 months old. We started out doing (relatively)short; runs and have since ran several half marathons together. He is very good on runs also. I've had no issues with him. When i got back from Afghanistan he was a little fat and out of shape so we haven't been able to go so far but were getting back after it. Any opinions on if this is good for this breed?
  • LosechLosech
    Posts: 2516
    @IkkiFenix Just start slow and short. Gradually work your way up to longer distances as he gets in better shape and loses weight. It can take a while, but if you don't rush anything he'll be fine.
    One of the ways I tell if a walk was long enough is what the dogs do when we get back. if they lay around, it was good. If they want to play, not long enough.
  • I've been taking my puppy on walks at night when I come home from work; around 7pm-8pm. It's a perfect time since there are less distractions on the trail that we walk. However, the past 2 days his been picking up the pace by doing a little sprint/jog. I finally caved in and decided to do a mild jog and he loves it. Of course we keep the run to less than a mile since his a little puppy but I've notice that he would run beside me rather than in front or behind. When we go walking, that's when he's pulling on his leash.

    Of course, since he's only 3 months old, I wasn't aware that pavement pounding would be bad for his hips and joints. I will keep it to a minimal and try to find grassy/dirt trails for him to run on.

  • BootzBootz
    Posts: 3131
    @949RedFlurry, interesting...Bootz is more on guard at night. She uses her ears more then locates the sounds and come to a standstill to let me know something is there. Walks while the sun is out is definitely better :)
  • redcattooredcattoo
    Posts: 1960
    @Bootz, for us a 7pm walk wouldn't be dark at all (don't know about @949RedFlurry though) and our dogs have perfect light at 7pm to feel comfortable walking.

    For example, at this time of year, our sunrise is around 6:45am and our sunset is 8pm. This means any walk between 6:30am and 8:15pm wouldn't be in the dark where a dog is more alert due to it being dark out.
  • ArcticArctic
    Posts: 513
    Thank you for detailing the light conditions near your home at different times.

    I've been trying to jog with Sansa, but to my surprise she's not into it. She lasted a quarter mile yesterday before she was over it and I had to walk her back home, leave her there and then finally go on a run. Hopefully she can start to enjoy it, since it's good exercise then I could kill two birds with one stone!
  • redcattooredcattoo
    Posts: 1960

    Bootz said:

    @949RedFlurry, interesting...Bootz is more on guard at night. She uses her ears more then locates the sounds and come to a standstill to let me know something is there. Walks while the sun is out is definitely better :)



    Was just pointing out that shouldn't assume that taking walks or jogs at night around 7pm-8pm means that you are not walking when the sun is out. @949RedFlurry very well may be in area where the sun is out at that time of day because I know for us it is.
  • BootzBootz
    Posts: 3131
    @redcattoo,

    I honestly dont know how to reply.
    "day" refers to sun rise to sun set"
    "Night" refers to "sunset to sun rise"

    @949RedFlurry just added on time for additional information/reference.
  • kumaDUDEkumaDUDE
    Posts: 1255
    I don't think it matters whether it be night time or not, typically for me, Kuma is more aware of what I'm doing as the day progresses. Example of my day
    I would walk him early in the morning, he would be all over the place playing and sniffing everything.
    Afternoon walks he's still active as hell, however, he starts looking over his shoulder to make sure I'm still keeping pace.
    Final walk of the night, whether it be 7pm as the sun sets, or be 10pm when it's completely dark; Kuma will stay only two or three strides ahead of me and always looking to see who or what are around.

    Now back to the running question, Kuma runs side to side with me, because he knows if he out runs me, unfortunately the leash only goes so far and will tug on him, so he learned to go my pace (slow).
  • redcattooredcattoo
    Posts: 1960
    Bootz said:

    @redcattoo,

    I honestly dont know how to reply.
    "day" refers to sun rise to sun set"
    "Night" refers to "sunset to sun rise"

    @949RedFlurry just added on time for additional information/reference.



    I call after work evening or night so i guess i misuse the word. It would be common to hear me say at night around 7pm my husband and I walk the boys. And that is before it is actually dark.

    Sorry I commented at all about the fact that trail jogging at 7pm might not mean it is being done with no light based on how I read the post.
    Post edited by redcattoo at 2013-08-09 17:37:39
  • http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_3/181.shtml

    I did the above with Tierce and it worked really well to accustom him (and me) to the demands of running. Unfortunately, the running kinda stopped when I started getting shin splints, but I'm thinking about starting up again. :D
    Visit ShibaInus.ca for Shiba evilness!
  • JuniJuni
    Posts: 763
    For shin splints- run on your toes! Shorter steps and run 'tip toe' until it stops, try! It's worked for me at least.
  • redcattooredcattoo
    Posts: 1960
    The Couch to 5k program is awesome! I can imagine it was a great way to get started and probably just as good for Tierce to do it with you.

    My mom used that program when we did our first 5k together and she was in her mid 60's and had never "run" per se before. She does sprint tris now that she realizes running a 5k isn't that hard.

    I would make sure you have proper running shoes and proper socks also to help with the shin splints, especially depending on what you mean by trails. It helps to have a running shop that can do a gait analysis and recommend the proper support level shoe. If you don't have a shop that can do a gait analysis, you can use the mizuno website to give you an idea too of what type of shoe would be best for you. Here is their website for the prcision fit test items to do http://www.mizunousa.com/running/innovation/precision-fit
  • Yeah, part of my problem is my perma-fallen arches that I have special orthotic insoles for. However, they didn't seem to bother me when I ran. Thanks for the advice! I'll check out that precision fit. Brooks Ariels seemed to work for me, but they are pricey.
    Visit ShibaInus.ca for Shiba evilness!
  • JuniJuni
    Posts: 763
    I also have the best cushioned shoes (tried out in special running store) and special fitted soles due to some feet problem and Ican still get shin splints and knee pains.
    Then I went to a running class held by one of those barefoot runners. He did not try and persuade us to all start running barefoot, but he did make us run with shoes on and then the same stretch barefoot and compare. When you run barefoot you land more on the front of your feet and with shorter steps otherwise it hurts. And that is the best way to run to prevent injuries in feet and knees. So I always try and think of it when I run and if something starts hurting I focus on how I land with my feet and making my steps shorter but faster. And it does help.
    I love my shoes and totally agree it is advisable to get the best kind and try them out on a treadmill in the store with someone who knows, but they won't help with all problems.

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

In this Discussion

Related Discussions

Who's Online (4)