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running with shiba
  • starrystarry
    Posts: 187
    anyone have tips running with their shibas?
    I have taken mine on a couple 2 mile runs, and he gets really ADD.
    He'll run for a bit, then slow down to a quick walk while staring at people across the street or behind us, and I'll have to pull him along till he starts running and then it starts all over.
    He is 8 months, I run slow, and the weather is around 50-60
    Does he just need some conditioning?
    anyway, here he is...I feel he is a little short compared to most shibas
    Post edited by curlytails at 2012-05-31 01:35:02
  • tsukitsunetsukitsune
    Posts: 6468
    Any dog definitely needs conditioning before they are expected to run at any distance. Especially a double coated growing shiba inu in 60 degree weather!
    A friend of mine is conditioning her elkhound to run by lunging with it on a 30 ft lead (like one would with a horse).

    I've tried starting to jog with my female shiba, she'll be 2 in June, and still very much a puppy. She gets far to distracted after like half a block, looking to sniff, chase a leaf, greet people, etc.
  • tsukitsunetsukitsune
    Posts: 6468
    p.s. Whole Dog Journal just (maybe a month or so ago?) put out an article on conditioning your dog for jogging or bike riding. Check it out!
    whole-dog-journal.com
  • I'm not 100% sure of this, so I'm more asking than giving advice....

    Isn't 8 months a little young to be running with a dog? Aren't the growth plates still not quite closed yet? The advice I've been given on agility and other high(er) impact exercise is to wait until 1 year minimum, but probably more like 1.5 years. I'd assume that applies to running too right?
  • starrystarry
    Posts: 187
    thanks for the advice,
    i was thinking 8 months may be too young,
    but he runs around the house and yard like a madman when he wants to play so I figured he was craving some good running time
    the hard part is how he gets so distracted by things, especially people even when they are across the street
    he is still young so hopefully that's it, or maybe it isn't in his nature to be a running buddy
    we'll just walk around for now, that's fun too
  • MeilianMeilian
    Posts: 40
    What I've heard from the breeders that I've spoken to is that you should def. wait until the dog is a year old at least before doing any type of distance running. As to whether or not Shibas are good running dogs overall, I've heard some people say they're great and others say not so much so I guess its down to the individual pup.

    Just as a word of caution, make sure you train the dog as you would a human. My mother and I are both runners and growing up, we used to go out with our Aussie Shepard mix for runs 3-4x per week. Unfortunatly we didn't ease her into it as much as we should have and also probably started running her too early (maybe around 9-10months) and she ended up having leg issues later on in life. She's still a healthy dog (for a 13 yr old!) but we had to completely put a stop to running with her when she was 7ish due to the issues she had.
  • thats good to know.... I want my dog to come on outings with us but it looks like we will def be waiting several more months. starry, love the picture too by the way... very handsome shiba!
  • 8 months is too young? That's really good to know; I was about to start taking my youngest shiba running with me (the older one is WAY too ADHD!), but I guess I'll have to wait a while longer!
  • apshibaapshiba
    Posts: 44
    Frost is now 14 months. I always run with him at a slow pace for 100 meters, then walk, let him sniff.chase leaves etc. Do another small trot. and then walk. I generally do a 30 minutue morning routine. He seems to enjoy it and then atleast I am sure when I put him in crate for the day, he has enough exercise and will nap nicely. I think a small run/jog at a slow speed does not hurt. I have also found that, at that speed they are less distracted by other things.
  • hondruhondru
    Posts: 529
    You're probably running on sidewalk, right? I would be concerned about running on such a hard surface at a young age. Running around the yard and playing on grass are natural for the pups, so I think they self-regulate with how much exercise they can handle.

    Also, I've found it easier to do things like running (not that I've run very often - I'm a horrible runner) and other fast things with dogs (scooters, bikes, rollerblades) that having them pulling ahead in a harness is easier than getting them to go beside me with a collar. It puts their pulling to good use, and they have to keep up a reasonable pace, because if they stop, I'll bump into them (gently, just enough to remind them that we have to get a move on). Running with a harnessed dog attached to your waist is called cani-cross. It's convenient because your hands are free, you aren't shaking the leash around as your arms move, and there's no worry about dropping it.

    btw - 2 miles of running? Holy freaking crap... I just joined the rugby team and even just running laps around the field nearly kills me. Running two miles would do me in for sure. Like I said, I'm a horrible runner.
    -Heidi, with Rakka (shikoku) and Sosuke (kai ken)
  • lepercannlepercann
    Posts: 243
    I'm a runner and thought I should take my male Shiba with me on my runs. He has stage 1 luxating patella but the vet said to try it because his knee was in good shape and he would try to start running when we took our walks every day. I ran with him for a few months and then he had a knee episode. Now he is on glucosamine and no more running, only long walks.
  • YuriYuri
    Posts: 8
    When Yuri was younger I used to take her on my runs. She definitely need a lot of work before she got up to two miles. Now she can out run me.
  • zobie02zobie02
    Posts: 89
    Sorry to bring up an old post, but what kind of distance will a shiba be ok with? He is a puppy now, so I know running with him should be done when he is fully grown, but can I eventually take my shiba on 10 mile runs? Or do I need a Rhodesian Ridgeback for that? We would be running through a city and a couple college campuses with lots of distractions, cars, people etc, and it will be on all sidewalk/streets.
  • sunyatasunyata
    Posts: 8548
    @zobie02 - Shibas are definitely not known for being long distance runners. In fact, they are more short distance sprinters. A 10 mile hike would probably be great (after working up to it), but I highly doubt you are going to get your Shiba to enjoy a run longer than a couple of miles, if even that.
    Bella 2Mountains 2Nola 2
    Casey, with Bella and Nola, hanging out in the mountains of Virginia.
    I Wander, I Ride
  • JuniJuni
    Posts: 1268
    Juni and I do about 3 miles at the moment and I am planning to try and work up to the double next summer. She can easily do it with me on bicycle, for some reason that is more entertaining.
  • zobie02zobie02
    Posts: 89
    @sunyata Thanks for the response. I guess I can run with him bring him back home and continue my run. Was hoping to avoid that, but I did that with my roommates pomeranian. She actually loves to run, she could probably go for 10 miles, I used to do 5 miles with her all the time and she wanted to keep running, but the vet said its bad for her, so I was hoping my puppy could be my new running buddy, but guess not!
  • zobie02zobie02
    Posts: 89
    @Juni Work up to the double? Double of 3 miles to 6 miles? Or do you mean double digits like 10 miles?
  • JuniJuni
    Posts: 1268
    I was thinking 6, getting too old for doing 10 miles myself. And lazy. But I don't think it's impossible otherwise.
  • SayaSaya
    Posts: 6678
    Saya enjoys hiking or walks where she can walk and sniff and explore things.

    Sometimes she enjoys a nice run though, but I only do it if she is up to it and once she is done there is no way to get her to run..

    Bella on other hand she lives to run!

    She enjoys our two walks a day, but also gets one run a day too except when weather is bad.

    You can slowly work up to it as a pup running on grass is better on joints I think.
    Photobucket
    Nicole, 5year old Bella(Boxer), and 4year old Saya(Shiba inu)
  • IdaUlaIdaUla
    Posts: 7
    I jog with Ūla once in a week. I jog in the park so I could run on sidewalk while she can enjoy grass. My pace is quite slow so she just walks next to me. When she is distracted by something I just make sound and tell her 'this way' and she comes back (usually!!)
  • I waited until Chihiro was over 7 months to begin taking her for slow jogs (~16 min/mile). I love to run and really wanted a running buddy. As for Chihiro? She loves it! I took her for a very slow 3 miles the other week and she was still pulling me to keep going at the end! I know it's a bit soon to start her on that kind of distance, but it really is a bit of energy management (I think she has nearly unlimited energy sometimes). Last weekend, I took her to a park and did 2.5 miles, but only did a few running intervals so she had plenty of time to walk and sniff around. I'm going to limit her to 3 miles maximum until she's 1-1.5 years though.

    So maybe I just have a Shiba that loves to run as much as I do?
  • Quoth: Phrase comes to mind…..just "because he can doesn't mean you should". Hopefully you are keeping it to short distances, but that isn't foolproof. Have you talked to your vet or had a check by a qualified orthopedic vet to get some advice on what physical stress to look in regard to your particular dog?

    There are many factors to consider, so no one pat answer. Breed, genetics, structure itself and growth stages. Also consider the equipment you are using the dog is actually clipped to.

    Under 16 months of age the skeletal frame generally is not solidified enough to support the underlying ligaments fully for side by side endurance paced runs. Stride for stride given the pace differential between dog and human strain can be problematic. Even playing fetch in heavily repetitive action can be problematic for some young dogs. IMHO taking it easy for awhile is best.

    Ultimately the most practical advice is go to a knowledgeable practitioner to work with your specific dog. Upon consultation they will be able to give WAY MORE practical advice than we can. Be sure to take pen and paper cause most of it will be too much to take in at once.

    Snf


    Post edited by StaticNfuzz at 2014-01-17 10:42:42
  • I did talk to my vet about both running and agility and he said to take it easy at first, which I am trying to do. That and no agility until after 9 months-1 year. The only reason I took her for so long the other week is that her stride was more of a fast walk/trot than a run (I'm still a slow human, my jog is as fast as other people walk). This past weekend, it was kept to a few very short sprints with long walking breaks in between.

    I'm not planning on taking her for longer, fast-paced runs until she's over 1.5 years. Even then, I'll probably always keep her under 5-6 miles. I want her to have a long healthy life :) Thank you for your concern though!

    And agility won't happen until she's well over a year...even the trainer says she needs to get a bit better with the basics before we move onto that lol.
  • umi-sanumi-san
    Posts: 113
    My Suki hates to run, it is a shame since I'm a runner.
    I read several months ago that for running it is better to use an roman harness. It seems to be more comfortable because is designed to eliminate pressure on the dog’s delicate trachea area.
  • BootzBootz
    Posts: 3495
    @QuothTheShiba only 7 months and doing 3 miles sounds like a lot.

    Please be warned that the more you train your Shiba, the more exercise she will expect from you with age. You are building up her stamina. My friend did the same with his dog, and now he has not been able to keep up with her energy level.

    If your Shiba has a lot of energy, try to give her some mental stimulation that will help tire her out. Also dog parks or dates with friends will help tire her out and is less stressful on her body.
  • It is a lot, which is why I'm scaling it back for a few months (and admittedly, it was a bit of an oops on my part. I hadn't realized how far we went until I stopped and checked my phone app). The longer (1 mi +) walks/jogs are only a once a week thing (if the weather's nice). Other than that, it's training class, play dates, food puzzles, etc. I try to have her outside a lot on the weekends because I'm in an apartment and have limited daylight during the week for walks. I'm pretty hesitant on dog parks though. I'm going to wait until her recall improves a bit more and I can find one with only a few dogs in it.
  • Kira_KiraKira_Kira
    Posts: 2482
    I go hiking with Kira, although it is natural vs man made terrain. Our first hike was 2.5 miles and it was a cake walk. We are doing 3 and 4 miles in the future. You could always build up stamina with hiking as a puppy and then graduate to running as they get older.
    Cynthia, Proudly owned by Kira
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  • JuniJuni
    Posts: 1268
    In all fairness it does sound like you run very slow (sorry!), so I'm not even sure your dog would have to move any faster than at a normal walk.
  • The last few times I tried taking Loki out for a run, he absolutely HATED it. In fact, he was in such protest against my running that he stopped me from even walking. He only allowed me to walk back towards my home.

    And even when he arrived home, he had no interest in going back outside in fear that I would force him to run. It was really weird since he loves being outdoors.

    Several hours later, he forgot about the whole ordeal and returned to his usual self. When hes in an open area though (a beach or a dog park), he will run with me no problem. Maybe he doesn't like being forced to run on a leash?
    www.lokishiba.wordpress.com
    Post edited by lokishiba at 2014-01-18 15:19:46
  • Juni- no worries :) I do run slow! I did try to emphasize that at most it was a trot/fast walk for her, but I can understand why people would be concerned. I'm doing it because I love to run and I'm trying to lose weight (3.5 lbs this past week alone!). I'm definitely not going to be taking her on any 10 min/mile runs or anything until she's much older!

    She does seem to enjoy it though, so that's a big plus :)
  • JuniJuni
    Posts: 1268
    :-)
    I believe Juni's natural pace is faster than my walking pace, if she is off leash or on a long leash it is very noticable how she prefers a quicker pace so I try to adapt to that when she runs with my bike.
    I never attempted any running before she was one though and to practice jogging with her I usually had to take the train a few stops and jog home. Jogging away from home just didn't make any sense to her...
  • LuvourSiLuvourSi
    Posts: 115
    Si will run along side me sometimes. I do have a question though, as we are going on our walk he insists on pulling (I've tried almost all methods to correct this) but when I reverse and turn back he stops pulling an will walk excellent beside me. What can I do to get him to understand that we can go a lot further on our walks if he doesn't pull? Again, to make myself clear he only pulls when we are headed in one direction and that is the direction we can go the furthest. All other directions he will stop pulling and walk right by me. When I say pull he pulls as in advance to that direction so its not like he is afraid and pulling to the side or back.
  • FuyutsukiFuyutsuki
    Posts: 62
    Wow, this thread definitely surprised me because Fuyu's normal walks during the day at easily 1+ mile, with the occasional jog normally around 15min/mi! I will have to tone down his exercise for a bit, at 10 months old I don't want to do him any damage.
  • oneluckymugoneluckymug
    Posts: 67
    We have run our Shibas as far as 8 miles. If you aren't in very good shape it won't matter a lot how far or fast you go, they will most likely be in much better shape than you and will improve faster than you as well. If you are in good shape then carefully work them up. It's very important to watch their paws and think about applying a mushers wax before you go. Wait until they are an appropriate age. For Shibas I would think 1 is ok to start. With our lab 18 months was when we started. When hot (obvious) and cold, lots and lots of water. Think about breaking longer runs into two different paced runs or something. They can go for miles but they aren't huskies, german pointers, or Catahoula leopard dogs....they do need some rest for longer runs.
  • Kobe1468Kobe1468
    Posts: 1587
    I honestly don't jog, so have no personal experience. I did come across a good article on the subject...it seems to make good sense:

    http://www.whole-dog-journal.com/issues/12_2/features/Jogging-With-Your-Dog_16100-1.html

    We live out in the country and go on long walks/hikes. He gets a lot of running in our yard, but for my own health(and his), thinking I may slowly introduce jogging into our routine.
    "Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened."
  • lindsaytlindsayt
    Posts: 4785
    Certain breeds have a much higher risk of injury especially straight legged breeds like Shibas. In general, dogs with severely straight stifles are prone to cruciate ligament ruptures and it is inherited. Good angulation helps "the machine" work longer without breaking down and wearing out prematurely. Not all Shibas have straight stifles, but they sure don't have the builds that working and sporting breeds have which would be better suited for repetitive impact. This doesn't mean they can't run and get exercise or be a worthy jogging partner...

    The main thing I like to emphasize is that dogs will work for us even if they are hurting themselves doing it, and it isn't fair of us as guardians to push them beyond their physical limits. Selecting a well built dog that can withstand the type of work we want them to do, and going to breeders who focus on breeding structurally sound dogs, is the key to having a healthy companion who can keep up with the things we ask them to do.

    My first Shiba has terrible structure, and was my first dog to try sports and Agility and Flyball with. At nearly 7, she has just started to limp at her last tournament and has now started refusing to do certain types of jumps to correctly hit the box. Her body is breaking down prematurely, and this summer I will completely retire her from high impact activities, just focusing on off leash hikes and scent work.

    This article was written by Fred Lanting, respected Shiba judge and expert on structure:

    http://www.dogstuff.info/stifles.html

    Good article about exersise recs for dogs:

    http://dogloversletter.com/how-to-exercise-your-dog/

    http://www.shetla.dk/kondition-uk.html
    "Common sense isn't so common"
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