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When to start supplementing with Glucosamine for prevention purposes?
  • RyuRyu
    Posts: 1623
    Hey guys,

    Ryu has been getting Glucosamine-Chondroitin supplements since he turned a year old as a preventative measure.

    We've been noticing lately that we can hear a slight popping noise when Roxy gets up from lying down. Though she hasn't had any other hip/joint issues that we know of, is 8 months too early to start supplementing with G/C? I just want to prevent as much damage as possible since the girl loves to jump up and down our furniture all day long. But I don't want to give it to her if she's too young and it might affect her development (in a negative way)

    As always, thanks for the amazing advice that is sure to come!
    Post edited by sunyata at 2012-08-09 10:00:59
  • My vets say 1 year is a good time to start.
  • RyuRyu
    Posts: 1623
    Thanks Jess! That's when we started Ryu too so maybe I'm just jumping the gun here... :)
  • tsukitsunetsukitsune
    Posts: 6468
    Our vet also said 1 year, though we started giving it to Tsuki at 10 months because her LP was at an undetermined stage at that point. Now we know its grade 1 (now that she stopped growing) and she still gets Glu/Chon
  • KFontaine04KFontaine04
    Posts: 1872
    Great Question! I wanted to give my kids Glu/Chon supplements but didn't know if it was too early for Sake.

    Thanks!
  • tsukitsunetsukitsune
    Posts: 6468
    Gluco/Chon can be pretty tough on your dog's stomach, too. We tried tablet form, but it wasn't going over too well. Adding fish oil (for omegas) and something like chicken feet with natural joint health properties are what we do now. Nature is safer, I think.

    Plus, a lot of dog food companies put it in their food, I know wellness core does. Check the ingredients of what you feed, it might already be in there!
    Post edited by tsukitsune at 2009-04-01 11:34:35
  • RyuRyu
    Posts: 1623
    Good call! Right now we're on EVO so I'll have to double check the ingredients.

    Ryu gets the chewable G/C but he also has a stomach of steel so Roxy might react differently. I might take her in to our vet just to get her hips checked out and ask her opinion as well.
  • KFontaine04KFontaine04
    Posts: 1872
    Pam,
    Which chewable G/C do you give? I would like to get that for Miso (of course just like Ryu, stomach of steel!).
  • RyuRyu
    Posts: 1623
    We got it at Target - Petcare brand I believe but I could be wrong.

    I would go check but the thought of getting out of this bed is making my migraine pound a little harder LOL
  • KFontaine04KFontaine04
    Posts: 1872
    DONT GET UP! I will find it. Thanks.
  • RyuRyu
    Posts: 1623
    lol thanks. Although, I should get up. The pups' breakfast time was 43 minutes ago LOL
  • RyuRyu
    Posts: 1623
    Hey Kristin - It's ProPet :D I was WAY-OFF lol
  • KFontaine04KFontaine04
    Posts: 1872
    Cool. I gotta make a Target run soon so I will grab some.
  • I guess 4 mo is way too early to start on Glucosamine. I hear I should wait until my pup gets all his adult teeth before giving him chicken feet. What do you guys think?
  • SayaSaya
    Posts: 6678
    I think it'd be fine to give chicken feet at that age.

    If I knew about the farmer who sells them when Saya was younger I'd be giving her chicken feet at 8 weeks old.. lol

    Saya gets chicken feet two times a week some times one.

    I also gotten beef gullet from hare today supposed to have condrotin or whatever haven't fed it to her yet I might try it next week.

    I give Saya chicken feet and it seems to help her a lot after a week on it she seemed more able to jump higher.

    For a pup chicken feet might be great for teething I feed it to Saya frozen she seems to like them thawed or frozen and frozen slows her down more.
    Nicole, 5year old Bella(Boxer), and 4year old Saya(Shiba inu)
    Post edited by Saya at 2011-02-17 16:26:23
  • lindsaytlindsayt
    Posts: 4785
    Chicken feet are fine with puppies. I would steer away from pill/powder supplements unless you know the dog has a clear issue.
    "Common sense isn't so common"
    photo c5d87957-61b6-48af-a440-4187cbfc861b_zps88ccdf88.jpg
  • We just started Zaius on G/C...he is 12yo. He had back surgery about 2 years ago and is a little slow getting up from naps sometimes. Our vet recommended it but I wasn't aware you should start it so early. What exactly is it preventing? Zaius never had any issues until his back.
  • lindsaytlindsayt
    Posts: 4785
    As I mentioned, you should not start puppies on supplement UNLESS you know there is an issue in the pup like arthritis, LP or HD, in which case it may help to keep the joints lubed.
    "Common sense isn't so common"
    photo c5d87957-61b6-48af-a440-4187cbfc861b_zps88ccdf88.jpg
  • Bump...

    About three weeks ago I noticed that occassionally especially on cold wet mornings my little boy Quake (3 1/2 years old) would limp for a few seconds when getting out of bed and sometimes when we would get out for a walk. He did not whine or anything and it did not seem like he was in any pain. It would last for one second or two and then he would be back to normal. I started to give him Liquid Health K-9 Glucosamine with OptiMSM, Hip and Joint Formula as a preventative on the advice of my vew. In about one week I noticed that any limping was completely gone. I will make sure to have the vet check him when we go for his vet visit in February but I wanted to share the good news.
  • Where to find chicken feet?? I can't say I've ever seen them in the grocery store lol
  • Try Asian markets (if you have any around you), or ethnic markets. They seem to always have the "unusual" cuts or parts of animals.
  • SayaSaya
    Posts: 6678
    Asian markets. butcher I go to will order chicken feet if asked so might be able to get from butcher.. local farmers or farmer market.

    I get chicken feet from farmer's market and mom gets it from someone at work who raises meat chickens.
    Photobucket
    Nicole, 5year old Bella(Boxer), and 4year old Saya(Shiba inu)
  • Super late to this party, but do you give your dog the chicken feet raw or cooked?
  • SayaSaya
    Posts: 6678
    I give it raw as cooked bones are no no in raw diet..

    I've bought dehydrated duck feet before and dogs did fine with it, but I can get raw for decent price in bulk. dogs go nuts over them.
    Photobucket
    Nicole, 5year old Bella(Boxer), and 4year old Saya(Shiba inu)
  • Going for a vet visit this week, but Dakota's limp upon getting up from a nap (lasst only 10 seconds) has pretty much gone away. However, am wondering if it is the start of some arthritic condition? Will talk with vet about joint supplements (Dakota is 5 now) for her. Wondered if anyone on the forum heard of or uses Phycox Max chews for joint issues? Apparently, the key ingredient here is Phycocyanin, which seems to be a naturally occurring anti-inflammatory and antioxidant extracted from blue-green algae. People swear by it on all the sites where it is sold and reviewed by consumers. Can anything be this good? Everyone claims that their dog's lameness or sore joints become miraculously much better or fine after a few days of using these supplements. Anyone use Phycox Max and if so, have you seen good results? She does get a squirt of salmon oil in her breakfast each morning too. Thanks!
    Post edited by DianaBoston at 2016-08-07 10:38:00
  • Nature isn't always safer; things like botulism are natural. I think nature is more harsh than we tend to think; evolution is based on selective pressure (often surviving longer to reproduce more) after all.

    That being said, I don't think it's necessary to supplement a young dog unless an issue is known or a genetic history of issues exists.

    Not all glucosamine/ch supplements are created equal, same with the stuff in food. Low molecular weight is better, higher molecular weight makes it less bio available. Unfortunately the better supplements with lower molecular weights are more expensive.

    Best things you can do for the health of a dog's joints are to keep them a healthy weight and keep them moving! Lifelong exercise and reducing the pressure on those joints by keeping weight healthy go a long way.

    For those who don't know; the gluc/ch supplements are essentially supplying nutrients to joints. Joints don't have direct blood flow and rely on joint fluid, cartilage and adjacent bone for nutrition. The body produces less joint fluid with age, and cartilage repair becomes more difficult. So, the body can't compensate for degenerative changes. By supplementing some of the nutrients found in joint fluid (sort of the building blocks for healthy joints) we are trying to help the repair process. Supplementing earlier can offset the gradual reduction in joint fluid sooner, which could mean less joint trouble later.
    Post edited by Lrose1990 at 2016-08-07 13:36:09
  • @lrose1990 good points all. Am confused though about supplementing a young dog. You did say you thought it wasn't necessary to supplement a young dog unless there is a known issue or genetic history. But then you did talk about supplementing with glucosomate chondroitin earlier than later. So, were you only talking about gluc/ch and not the product I was referring to -- the Phycox Max? Anyway, I am pretty sure that the vet will rule out anything serious. I'll see what she has to say in a few days. I just hate to see Dakota limp -- even if only for 5 seconds or so when she gets up. I'm thinking an x-ray will show nothing either. Hope they wouldn't have to sedate to get one.
    Post edited by DianaBoston at 2016-08-07 20:04:13
  • To clarify;

    I'm not sure that a 1-year old pup needs to be supplemented, as many are still growing and at that phase of life their joints and cartilage should be pretty healthy. By starting earlier, I meant before there's a problem. For example, our husky is 12 and has osteoarthritis (OA) in her knees. It kind of snuck up on my family, because Kiba wasn't showing overt signs of pain (largely because my parents weren't exercising her much, but that's a rant for another day), and the inflammation was already pretty significant when we started supplementing gluc/ch. Luckily we have great vets who got her on a regimen of pain medication and gluc/ch, and it's done wonders.

    However, had we begin to supplement her earlier (probably around 5-6 years), the initial damage may have been lessened. If we had come out in front of the OA, we could have possibly avoided some of the inflammation, etc.

    So what I'm trying to say is; supplementing as a preventative measure is good, but maybe not so early?
  • @lrose1990 Oh, sorry, actually Dakota is 5 years old, not 1.

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