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New aggression
  • My shiba has suddenly become entitled. Sometimes at dinner she will sit next to my father, quietly, very nicely just sit there. However tonight, when she "pawed" his foot, trying to beg for food, I decided to shoo her out of the kitchen. She growled, and went to nip me! Any idea what this was about??
  • Kira_KiraKira_Kira
    Posts: 2482
    My Shiba is spoiled rotten and gets people food. And if that's the case with yours, I'll be the first to admit that you are asking for a naughty dog that begs and "tests boundaries" when they don't get their way.

    A couple months ago, I wasn't giving Kira any food when I was eating and she barked at me! I immediately told her a stern NO and put her in her crate. In extreme cases, scraps and people food should be eliminated from their diet completely. I would absolutely keep your dog separated from you both when you eat if that's how she is reacting.
    Cynthia, Proudly owned by Kira
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    Post edited by Kira_Kira at 2015-03-25 20:42:02
  • Kobe1468Kobe1468
    Posts: 1588
    I agree with Kira....but just a snippet of why this isn't aggression...

    aul Scott, a founding member of the Animal Behavior Society and prolific author, said this about aggression:

    'Aggression is a poor scientific term and chiefly functions as a convenient handle to relate phenomena described in more objective terms to practical human problems. What we are really concerned with is agonistic behavior, a behavioral system composed of behavior patterns having the common function of adaptation to situations involving physical conflict between members of the same species. We cannot analyze fighting behavior without also studying the alternate behavior patterns of escape, threat, "freezing", defensive posture, dominance and subordination, etc. (Scott, 1966)'

    I would do as Kira suggests, as well as read the existing threads on aggression.
    "Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened."
  • zandramezandrame
    Posts: 1106
    Spoiled or not, in the original description I don't see any aggression. But if "shooing" involves physically relocating the dog against her wishes, that is a physical correction, which Shibas are notorious for responding negatively to. And she expressed her displeasure with it.

    Instead of correcting, lure the dog somewhere more appropriate, like a different room or crate, and give her something constructive to do (toys or food). This is redirection, and the key to successful Shiba training, using positive reinforcement only. Work on associating a command with this behavior and you will be able to ask for obedience whenever you need it ("go to kennel," or "off the couch"). Reward success but do not punish failure, redirect it.

    Read the basics of redirection here -
    http://smartdoguniversity.com/secrets-dog-training-success-redirect-substitute-reward/
  • Kira_KiraKira_Kira
    Posts: 2482
    I'm glad you brought up the "shooing" @zandrame - I meant to ask what was exactly done in my answer as well.

    When I say that I put Kira back in her crate, I give her the normal kennel command "Go To Jail" and always reward her with a treat each time. (whether she goes in the crate for being bad or good, the treat always happens because it reinforces her always listening to the command)

    Definitely make sure you send her to the crate or away from food with a command, not pushing or shooing then away against their will.
    Cynthia, Proudly owned by Kira
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    “Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.”
  • Thanks for all the comments!!

    Shooing - I went to her and physically began to relocate as Zandrame assumed.

    She doesn't get people food often, and I say often, because the only time she does is from my father at that spot when no one is looking.

    We were always told that the crate could serve as either a punishment point, or a safe zone, but not both, and we chose the safe zone.

    To be honest, this is our 3rd dog, but the first we've tried to keep under control really. Our first two dogs seemed like the shy kids of the class, never getting in trouble so we never had to do anything... obviously just saying Shiba changed that :P
  • zandramezandrame
    Posts: 1106
    lemiwinks said:

    We were always told that the crate could serve as either a punishment point, or a safe zone, but not both, and we chose the safe zone.


    It's not a punishment if the dog enjoys her crate and is rewarded for being there. This is a safe zone.

    I'd suggest getting her to her safe zone before you start eating, so she cannot beg from your father. Break the habit, for the dog and the human. ;)

    Do you have a Kong? You can occupy her in the crate with a Kong filled with kibble, peanut butter, or plain yogurt, or something like a bully stick if you allow those.
  • NikkitineNikkitine
    Posts: 776
    Ah, training the parents. That's tougher for me than training any dog I've ever had. You tell them to stop feeding human food to your dogs, they say they understand, then right when you turn around, they quickly drop a piece. Then when you catch them, they proceed to guilt trip you, saying that you're starving your dogs, and look at how hungry they look. Only way I've gotten through to them is to revoke puppy privileges.
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