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advice needed for classmate
  • HaloHalo
    Posts: 278
    I was talking with my friends in class about our dogs, and a classmate who overheard us asked to see a picture of Halo. I showed the classmate one I that had on my cell phone...immediately they said. "Its so cute I have to get one". Normally I would stay out of people choices such as that, but this person has also told us that they know nothing about taking care of a puppy, nor anything about training it and that they have a significant other who is against getting a dog. I know that they want a dog, but how do I show this person that getting a shiba is a bad idea. I tried telling the person about shibas and how they aren't for a person not experienced with dogs, but it seemed to fall of deaf ears and they person told me they are gonna look into getting one. I told the person about this site and I do hope they take a look at it. All I can think is a poor shiba landing in a shelter because the person didn't know how to train it and it became too much for them.
    Post edited by Halo at 2013-09-15 20:46:00
  • Send them to the Misanthropic Shiba:

    http://shibainus.ca/chapter-00-the-misanthropic-shiba/chapter-1-so-you-think-you-want-a-shiba/
    http://shibainus.ca/chapter-00-the-misanthropic-shiba/chapter-2-should-you-get-a-dog/
    http://shibainus.ca/chapter-00-the-misanthropic-shiba/chapter-3-should-you-get-a-shiba/

    In my experience, I've found that you can only give it your best effort, and then it's out of your control. Some people are determined to make bad choices no matter what you tell them. It's also hard to convince them otherwise when you're trying to do so with your own adorable, well-behaved Shiba by your side. People tend to be oblivious to the drudgery and hard work that goes into making your Shiba available for public view. Heh.

    It's part of why Shibas are so dangerous. They automatically sell themselves just by being seen...
    image
    Bowdu 寶肚 (Shiba) and Bowpi 寶媲 (Basenji) with M.C.
    Post edited by curlytails at 2013-09-16 00:06:11
  • My personal experience is that I really wished the owner of a shiba didn't tell me they were bad dogs for first time owners because that became completely untrue for me personally. I really wanted to get a shiba for a first dog but was advised against it by an owner. As result we got another breed that's supposed to be a good "first time dog" according to tons of links and articles on Google and it turned out to be an extremely difficult experience...which was the exact opposite of what we we researched.

    To be honest both my bf and I wish we had gotten our shiba first because she is WAY easier to take care of and train in every way possible. I think even if a breed can overall be "difficult" or "easy", its best to still mention that individual dog personalities vary. It's good to warn people but still mention that good breeders make a difference and that not every dog is the same even though the breed can be generalized in a certain way. :(
    Post edited by sophiahan8 at 2013-09-16 03:12:18
  • RikkaRikka
    Posts: 1501
    It's also hard to convince them otherwise when you're trying to do so with your own adorable, well-behaved Shiba by your side. People tend to be oblivious to the drudgery and hard work that goes into making your Shiba available for public view. Heh.


    This.
    image
    Lauren, living with a 4 y/o Shiba named after a scientist. ☆
  • While Shiba's are not recommended for first time dog owners, I decided on a Shiba as my first dog. Yes, he has challenged me. Yes, would he and I have overcome some of our issues quicker if I had known how to train better right from the start, maybe. Even so, he has taught me a lot and despite his issues I love him.

    I don't discourage first time dog owners from the breed I have fallen in love with, but I do make sure that at least I have told them how in retrospect I may have underestimated some of the traits. Again letting them know how much I love the breed, but how much work it has been and how much I have invested as a first time owner in actively learning about the breed and positive training methods.

    I do understand the red flags that have you concerned, but sometimes supporting them is better than working against them. Just giving them the resources and knowledge you have is the best course of action IMO. This way as they work towards possibly getting a pup you can at least help guide them the right direction for resources because they trust coming to you for advice on the breed.

    While Shiba's are not recommended for first time dog owners, I don't believe it isn't possible either with the right commitment and support system.
  • SayaSaya
    Posts: 6678
    Labs are touted as good first time dogs, but they as breed do require a lot of work and not everyone is up for that too..

    sophiahan8 sorry people made you feel that way. :\ I've met some Bichons, but never owned one before. I'm more into spitz breeds so shiba fits with me fine.

    that they have a significant other who is against getting a dog
    This does hit the nail my neighbor gotten a lab/mastiff mix and from sounds of it wife didn't want it.. Both owners did zero socialization, training and the dog outside almost 24/7 no exercise.

    I'm fine with indoor/outdoor dogs, but not ones where they are neglected and not exercised.

    They finally got rid of the dog or it ran off. The dog had no id tag so no way anyone could return it.

    This dog is huge ever met a lab or mastiff both mixed made for a bigger looking lab! Crazy! She had horrible manners would jump, mouth and not leave people or my dogs alone.

    Really this person has wife/husband, boyfriend/girlfriend or whatever that doesn't want a dog it is not good to get it as it might cause issues. plus much easier having two people raising a pup.

    A first time dog owner is possible, but they have to do their research met the breed and find an reputable breeder who cares about temperament and health.
    Photobucket
    Nicole, 5year old Bella(Boxer), and 4year old Saya(Shiba inu)
  • umi-sanumi-san
    Posts: 113
    Hi Hallo,
    When people ask me about the Shiba Inu, I do not discourage them but what I do is to tell them about their temperament. I always make clear that this is not a dog to walk off-leash, that they are difficult to train due their independent character and so on (of course also tell them about the good things too). But what I found that discourages most of the not-too-serious future owners, is the dog's price. When I told them that the dog price is 1,500 and above (and also the budget need it to get accessories, vaccines, pet classes, etc) that make them change their mind a little. Maybe if you talk to them about prices and an overall budget, it might make them think twice about getting a Shiba (and any dog, if they are not mentally prepared for introducing any dog to their family).
    Of course there is always the possibility that they will get a Shiba from a pet shop (where the price is not expensive), but you can be relief that you did try to give them a precious information, whether they ignore you or not.

    As redcatto said, you could try working with them. If they are willing to listen to you. I spoke with people that don't really care, they just want a Shiba because she is cute! To that kind of people, I strongly discourage them by telling them only negative points of the Shibas. But as I said before, once they know the price, their face changes hahahaha.
    If you think your friend has the ability and could be a good listener, I'll say go for it!
  • HaloHalo
    Posts: 278
    I wasn't trying to make it out to that person that shiba inus are bad dogs or anything. I am just worried that this person really really doesn't know what they are getting themselves into. The person seemed to have an unrealistic expectation of how a dog should be. I think that they have a lot of research to do, what I was trying to explain to the person is that they shouldn't get a dog based soley upon its looks, which was what they were acting like they were doing. I just highly recommended to the person to really do their research, and talk to other people about different breeds. Who knows, having a shiba may or may not be the right dog for them.
  • HaloHalo
    Posts: 278
    @umi-san
    Yes, shibas are not an off leash dog! and I told the person that, and they looked at me like I was from Mars. I explained to them about the high prey drive and that a good part of them do not have good re-call. I am still working with Halo on that, and she is almost one year old, and she is horrible about it. In fact, she is still the little escape artist. Escaped out of her leash the other day and about gave me a heart attack due to us hiking in the woods and knowing if she didn't come to me, I could have lost my baby. She came to me after I called her a few times telling her I had a treat (that is the only thing that will make her come to me)
  • If you really think they are serious and not just talking, which many people do. All you really can do is continue to share your knowledge and experience so they know the good and the bad. It is hard not to fall in love with how they look first and then fall even more in love once you know more about them.

    Maybe print off some resources and information on the breed to give them since it sounds like you are in class together. As I noted though I would keep things positive if you care about guiding them because if they feel resistance from you they may shut down and no longer even discuss where they are at in regards to a puppy with you anymore. You for sure probably want to keep the discussion open so worse case you can guide them to good resources and educate them on finding a good breeder to reduce the potential for the health and temperament issues more common in BYB and puppy mill dogs.
  • Halo said:

    @umi-san
    Escaped out of her leash the other day and about gave me a heart attack due to us hiking in the woods and knowing if she didn't come to me, I could have lost my baby. She came to me after I called her a few times telling her I had a treat (that is the only thing that will make her come to me)



    Oh yes, the heart dropping escape, slip collar, what do I do because they have poor recall (and I have worked on it truly I have) issue ... have had a couple too many of those moments with Bear.
  • HaloHalo
    Posts: 278
    If the person does show serious interest in getting a shiba, maybe it may help them to see how Halo is. She is not the world's best behaved shiba, but I would say she is a very good shiba. We still have a long way to go with her training. Re-call and manners are the 2 biggest issues I have. She likes to jump on people, and I am trying to break her of that as it is annoying to me and guests. Also re-call, inside, she will come to me most of the time, outside is a whole different story. I hope to take her to a dog park once it gets colder, and work with her off leash outdoors in a fenced in area since I can't do that at my apartment complex.
  • SayaSaya
    Posts: 6678
    Saya still jumps every so often on mom and she is four. lol

    She is better though and it is just a once in while occurrence when she gets too excited. Usually when mom ignores her she stops.

    Saya pulls so much attention it is nuts.

    It's good first time dog owners to know the good and bad of the breed.

    I think it helped me prepare more and make sure I worked on socialization even more.
    Photobucket
    Nicole, 5year old Bella(Boxer), and 4year old Saya(Shiba inu)
  • BootzBootz
    Posts: 3495


    In my experience, I've found that you can only give it your best effort, and then it's out of your control. Some people are determined to make bad choices no matter what you tell them. It's also hard to convince them otherwise when you're trying to do so with your own adorable, well-behaved Shiba by your side. People tend to be oblivious to the drudgery and hard work that goes into making your Shiba available for public view. Heh.

    It's part of why Shibas are so dangerous. They automatically sell themselves just by being seen...



    I second this.

    Some people have to learn the hard way no matter how much you try. When I walk my Shiba offleash I usually tell people "this is not the norm, not all shibas can do that" I give them both sides to owning a shiba, both good and bad. What they decide is out of your control, you can only influence.
  • The fact that Shibas are not recall dogs worries me too, I'm so paranoid that Kira will bolt out the door, so she is trained to sit before she is allowed outside until we release her. I also am clicker-training her so that she associates the clicker with treats. I take the clicker everywhere with me, and intend to use it if, God forbid, she gets loose. Kira hears the click and comes running!
    Cynthia, Proudly owned by Kira
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    “Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.”

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