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Eating anything he finds on walks but gets leave it fine at home
  • DjinnDjinn
    Posts: 161
    So, I know that issues with drop it/leave it come up fairly often but this is kind of specific. Hayate is as well trained as I can possibly get him to drop/leave anything familiar. But when we walk, the excitement of "catching" something (usually garbage and food scraps) is so much more powerful than any motivation to drop whatever it is. Even if he picked up an old tissue I don't think he'd swap it for a whole bag of treats from me. I know that the idea of food based training is to move beyond any need for the treat, I'm just trying to illustrate how exciting it is for him to pick things up outside. A few days ago he found and ate a whole broiled fish and just now he ate a plastic bag. He's going to kill himself one of these days. If I try to physically grab whatever it is away from him he attacks me and I've sustained some very bad bites doing it, so I don't try anymore. I panicked with the fish and was so desperate to get it off him that I pulled him up by the leash and shook him to try and get him to drop it, but to no avail. Apparently he can eat and choke at the same time. I felt awful afterwards because he's already a bit leash shy and I just reinforced that his collar and leash are things to be scared of. I just didn't know what else to do.
    There is no point doing any further work on the command with things I provide because he is fine. I've been successful training him to drop food and toys for me in places like the park, but only with things I have provided in the first place. If it's something he has found and claimed, no hope. I'm reluctant to take him to the dog park anymore because other people always bring toys and Hayate always steals them. I don't know if it is a prey drive thing but it just seems that there is nothing in the world more important than whatever he has found in that moment.
    I have been trying for years to find a behaviorist who could help us but there's just no one in our location and no one willing to travel here for a price we could afford, so I am on my own and out of my depth.
  • lindsaytlindsayt
    Posts: 4785
    Metal bowls, wire mesh, bland treats. Plant some bowls along your walk route with very bland bisquit treats, and securely cover them with wire mesh. Practice walking by them and offer roast beef, cheese cubes, PB on a stick, whatever he doesn't get normally that is irresistible. You can gradually increase the level of yumminess of the off limits treats in the inaccessible bowls. Praise when he looks at you or leaves the food alone, and eventually you will be pairing it with a leave it. From what you describe, your leave it training is not reliably trained or proofed outside the home where it really matters, so you will need to really work on setting up situations where he can never get rewarded for ignoring you, that won't require you to put your hands near him. This method will work if you are diligent and patient.
    "Common sense isn't so common"
    photo c5d87957-61b6-48af-a440-4187cbfc861b_zps88ccdf88.jpg
  • DjinnDjinn
    Posts: 161
    That's a really good idea, thank you.
  • tatonkatatonka
    Posts: 1210
    I have the same problem and I will try this!
    Monkey!
  • amtiamti
    Posts: 1066
    One thing I would recommend is to learn how to pry open a dog's mouth. It is good to know in an emergency or where the dog is eating something dangerous. I've used it a few times with my older dogs when they needed meds that couldn't be taken with food.
  • tatonkatatonka
    Posts: 1210
    So how do you pry open a dog's mouth?
    Monkey!
  • BootzBootz
    Posts: 3495
    tatonka said:

    So how do you pry open a dog's mouth?



    With a crow bar!!


    Bootz is good with leaving it at home and in public. Of course she has her urges where she wants to prance on the trash blowing in the wind. I usually just use "leave it" and then use another command like "let's go".

    I rarely have to pry their mouths open since they drop it with "leave it"

    But last time Jackie picked up a piece of old French fry. I usually just find whatever opening I can, stick my fingers in and pry it open. Bootz and Jackie has yet to chomp down on me while my hands are in their mouth.
  • yoshibackyoshiback
    Posts: 12
    My dog has this problem and if I try to reach for his mouth, he swallows whatever it was that he picked up if it is edible enough, for example dead bugs, clumps of grass, paper. He's only 6 months old though, so I was hoping it would get better as he grew older. Might have to try this if it doesnt.
  • sunyatasunyata
    Posts: 8548
    @Djinn - In addition to the exercises that @lindsayt suggested (which is a great suggestion and will help you work on using the command in a more stimulating and distracting environment), I highly suggest that you get a shorter lead.

    I am not sure what you are using, but it sounds like you do not have very much control over where your dog goes and what he can pick up. If you are using a flexi lead (or even a six food lead), stop and get a shorter lead. I use a four foot lead for most walks and the dogs do great with them. I have complete control over where they go and can keep an eye out for anything that I do not want them to get into (Nola is a vacuum cleaner and will eat anything, which is not good for her since she has some food allergies and some major medical issues).

    So working with the "leave it" command, using a shorter leash, and paying attention to your surroundings should yield great results for Hayate. :)
    Bella 2Mountains 2Nola 2
    Casey, with Bella and Nola, hanging out in the mountains of Virginia.
    I Wander, I Ride
  • redcattooredcattoo
    Posts: 1960
    It sounds like you have not achieved reliable training of "leave it" and that a lot of work is still needed to proof it.

    Djinn said:

    A few days ago he found and ate a whole broiled fish and just now he ate a plastic bag.



    How is he even able to get to a whole broiled fish and a plastic bag?

    Djinn said:


    There is no point doing any further work on the command with things I provide because he is fine. I've been successful training him to drop food and toys for me in places like the park, but only with things I have provided in the first place.



    What do you mean their is no point in further work, what you describe indicates there is lots of need for further work, further proofing, and elevating distance, distraction, and variety of items.

    Are you putting enticing things even in your yard and proofing the "leave it"? If you put a broiled fish in your yard, put him on leash and began walking by the broiled fish would he obey "leave it". Is he only obeying if you are standing still and not in motion.

    You say you are successful training him to drop food and toys in places like the park, but drop it is different than leave it.

    With leave it you have to be very diligent and set your dog up for success. They need to understand in all situations leave it means not to even touch it. Problem is once they have succeeded several times despite your leave it command it becomes harder, so if you have failed several times using leave it you may also want to consider starting at the very beginning with basic criteria again but using a new term like "ignore it" and assuring that you work on that using it only when you know you have set him up for success. I would start with "ignore it" using puppy zen techniques and elevating the "ignore it" to include eye contact in the house. Then I would move that to other rooms, the garage, the yard, a park, all while on leash and assuring he can't fail by getting the object he is supposed to "ignore".

    As he begins to show comprehension of "ignore it" with puppy zen, elevate the training to use it when you drop the item but be ready to body block or step on the item so he can't get it and don't reward him with the item reward him with a different item. As he builds on his understanding, put an enticing item in a bowl and work on walking by it but never let him be able to reach the bowl. Keep working up proofing distance from the item getting closer and closer also proof motion and walking around and past what you have told him to ignore.

    Post edited by redcattoo at 2013-07-30 09:41:21
  • lindsayt said:

    Metal bowls, wire mesh, bland treats. Plant some bowls along your walk route with very bland bisquit treats, and securely cover them with wire mesh. Practice walking by them and offer roast beef, cheese cubes, PB on a stick, whatever he doesn't get normally that is irresistible. You can gradually increase the level of yumminess of the off limits treats in the inaccessible bowls. Praise when he looks at you or leaves the food alone, and eventually you will be pairing it with a leave it. From what you describe, your leave it training is not reliably trained or proofed outside the home where it really matters, so you will need to really work on setting up situations where he can never get rewarded for ignoring you, that won't require you to put your hands near him. This method will work if you are diligent and patient.



    I have the same problem as well. I am able to stick my fingers in her mouth to get whatever she is chewing on out, but I am not able to get to it in time before it gets in her mouth. I will have to try this @lindsayt
  • amtiamti
    Posts: 1066
    Tatonko, I learned this method:
    http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/cliented/dog_meds.aspx
  • tatonkatatonka
    Posts: 1210
    @amti, oh wow. I can try and give Tatonka oral meds now! I'm going to try this with his next Trifexis pill. Usually I crush it up into powder then hide it inside meat - which he detects most of the time and won't eat :|

    And I don't know what the deal is with him. Delicious human food in front of his face inside the house - won't touch it, even if he's not being watched. Rotten food covered in shoe marks on the sidewalk? Mmm mm all over it.
    Monkey!
  • redcattooredcattoo
    Posts: 1960
    tatonka said:

    @amti, oh wow. I can try and give Tatonka oral meds now! I'm going to try this with his next Trifexis pill. Usually I crush it up into powder then hide it inside meat - which he detects most of the time and won't eat :|



    Yeah, I hate the monthly Trifexis pill time. That pill has such a strong odor I can't hide it in anything. I have to basically open their mouth quickly and get the pill way back in then hold their muzzle up stroking their neck to assure they swallow it.

    If I don't do it right they spit it up and it is even harder as they are prepared for the second round attempt.

    I got lucky this month. I effectively got it way back into their muzzle, they both swallowed it and got a whole cheese stick each right after and for the first time didn't avoid me for hours after.
  • redcattooredcattoo
    Posts: 1960
    I just looked at the link ... I like the thought of this even though I don't seem to get bit luckily so far when I have had to give pills this way.

    ... Gently fold the upper lip over the teeth as you open the mouth. If the dog bites down with your hand in her mouth, she will bite her lip and will not bite your hand. Place your thumb on the roof of the dog's mouth. You do not have to fold the dog's lip over their teeth but this does reduce the chance of you being bit.
    Post edited by redcattoo at 2013-07-30 16:06:46
  • Goat cheese seriously works wonders.
  • redcattooredcattoo
    Posts: 1960

    Goat cheese seriously works wonders.



    Eeeewwwwww, that is one cheese I personally can't stand to eat. I can imagine though why a dog would like it. Even so that Trifexis pill is really hard to disguise and the moment my dog has any idea it is in something or in his mouth it goes downhill.
  • zandramezandrame
    Posts: 1106
    LOL! Goat cheese is awesome! It's the bully sticks I don't understand ;)

    When we were doing trifexis, peanut butter always worked wonders.
  • redcattooredcattoo
    Posts: 1960
    zandrame said:

    LOL! Goat cheese is awesome! It's the bully sticks I don't understand ;)

    When we were doing trifexis, peanut butter always worked wonders.



    Yeah, tried the peanut butter, even tried it by making the pill smaller, but the minute he noted the pill was in peanut butter it was a mess. He spit it up and it was now in tiny pieces that were even harder to gather and get him to take. For me getting it behind their tongue with a quick hold the mouth open move and then closing their mouth until they swallow is the only thing that worked.

    Last month I didn't get it far enough behind their tongue and they managed not to swallow it and spit it back up. Once they do this with both boys their jaws becomes an iron trap making second attempts to open it harder.
    Post edited by redcattoo at 2013-07-30 16:50:53
  • I love goat cheese. Our girl will eat just about anything (and I had a habit of sticking unwanted pills in taleggio for her). My boy will eat around and spit out, including a giant gob of peanut butter. He does love goat cheese enough to just gobble it in a gulp even though he sees me stick the pill in it. Admittedly our monthly cheese budget is high but that's more my fault ;-)

    @redcattoo - why the aversion? Too gamey?
  • BootzBootz
    Posts: 3495
    @amti, blowing on the nose....I will have to try that.

    I can't hide Bootz' PROIN in her raw meat anymore. Now a days I feed her pills to her by doing what what your link says, except I push the pill into the back of her tongue. She's very gentle and never bit down before. She Always tried backing out first so that my hand is out of the way, then close her mouth.
  • redcattooredcattoo
    Posts: 1960

    I love goat cheese. Our girl will eat just about anything (and I had a habit of sticking unwanted pills in taleggio for her). My boy will eat around and spit out, including a giant gob of peanut butter. He does love goat cheese enough to just gobble it in a gulp even though he sees me stick the pill in it. Admittedly our monthly cheese budget is high but that's more my fault ;-)

    @redcattoo - why the aversion? Too gamey?



    Yes, I am not a big gamey fan. My country club where I work of course (it is a very high end exclusive club) uses goat cheese so we get it for salads in the employee dining room . I can't stand it if it has even touched my salad I seem to know.

    I will have to keep goat cheese in my back pocket though to try as a high value reward. So far liverwurst has worked too as a very special reward ... but so far nothing works for Trifexis other than just getting it in and down then rewarding for that process.
    Post edited by redcattoo at 2013-07-30 17:06:57
  • tatonkatatonka
    Posts: 1210
    @zandrame, Tatonka has stripped many Trifexis pills clean of goat cheese. He then spits the pill out. :p

    In terms of getting the pill down the hatch, Tatonka never bites down on my hand but he is slippery like a baby otter. Ive never been able to get it down far enough. Trifexis pill is too big for the mouth of any pill tube-syringe thing I've found at Petsmart.
    Monkey!
    Post edited by tatonka at 2013-07-31 02:02:49
  • amtiamti
    Posts: 1066
    This method doesn't require strength other than keeping your dog from running away. My son also taught me the finger on the roof of the mouth, which he says a dog cannot close his mouth as long as your finger is there, but I'm not totally sold on that method since I've never used it.

    The part where you stick the pill as far back in the throat will make your dog hack if you take too long, so it should be done quickly.

    I also fed the dog a great treat right after putting the pill on the back of the throat and stroking. If you don't do it right, it gets pretty messy, so always try to get it down the first time. Even if the pill went down (sometimes it gets stuck in the upper esophagus), my Samoyed used to try to hack it up, so it was really helpful to have something to wash the pill down readily available. Blowing on the nose achieves the same result. For some reason, they forget everything but wanting to eat the cheese when they see cheese and gobble it down. Once the cheese is gone, there is no turning back for the pill. That's usually when I pat myself on the back and think VICTORY!!! :D I've also used this method for cleaning teeth but would have my dog lay on the floor, on her side with her head on my lap.
  • redcattooredcattoo
    Posts: 1960
    amti said:


    I also fed the dog a great treat right after putting the pill on the back of the throat and stroking. If you don't do it right, it gets pretty messy, so always try to get it down the first time. Even if the pill went down (sometimes it gets stuck in the upper esophagus), my Samoyed used to try to hack it up, so it was really helpful to have something to wash the pill down readily available. Blowing on the nose achieves the same result. For some reason, they forget everything but wanting to eat the cheese when they see cheese and gobble it down. Once the cheese is gone, there is no turning back for the pill. That's usually when I pat myself on the back and think VICTORY!!! :D I've also used this method for cleaning teeth but would have my dog lay on the floor, on her side with her head on my lap.



    Sounds like what I do, you are right though if you don't do it right, it gets messy and they get real stubborn. At least I am getting better and more confident with the method and have less failure. I usually sit on the floor and wrap my legs around them too when I do this as they know legs around them usually means they are not going to win by struggling. And yes, very tasty food right after seems to prevent them from working on spitting it back up.
  • DjinnDjinn
    Posts: 161
    amti said:

    One thing I would recommend is to learn how to pry open a dog's mouth. It is good to know in an emergency or where the dog is eating something dangerous.


    I did mention the savage biting, right? XD

    sunyata said:

    it sounds like you do not have very much control over where your dog goes and what he can pick up.


    Funnily enough the fish incident was actually on the very shortest leash available. He's very particular about where he poos, and it's almost impossible to tell the difference between rummaging through leaves looking for the perfect poo spot and rummaging through leaves to find something that smells tasty. I can avoid things I can see but I can't check under bushes, in tree roots, under leaves etc. I'm not arguing with you, a shorter leash is sound advice, but perhaps more applicable to an urban setting :)



    redcattoo said:


    Djinn said:


    There is no point doing any further work on the command with things I provide because he is fine. I've been successful training him to drop food and toys for me in places like the park, but only with things I have provided in the first place.



    What do you mean their is no point in further work, what you describe indicates there is lots of need for further work, further proofing, and elevating distance, distraction, and variety of items.

    Are you putting enticing things even in your yard and proofing the "leave it"? If you put a broiled fish in your yard, put him on leash and began walking by the broiled fish would he obey "leave it". Is he only obeying if you are standing still and not in motion.

    You say you are successful training him to drop food and toys in places like the park, but drop it is different than leave it.



    Like I said, he is quite capable of staying away from or dropping anything that comes from me. I have dropped an entire bag of kibble in the house and he kept off it for me. Yes, if I put a whole fish in the garden he would leave it. Even if we were walking. The deciding factor is, for want of a more accurate term, hunting instinct. If he "catches" something by himself, he wont give it up. Does that make the difference clearer?

    And I am talking about drop it, leave it only helps if I see the item first, and if I could do that he wouldn't be getting near it in the first place.







    Post edited by Djinn at 2013-08-04 23:23:33
  • BootzBootz
    Posts: 3495
    @Djinn I think you should try the exercises Lindsayt recommended. I would even encourage training your dog outside more. The training your did with your shiba in the house dont seem to work outside of the house. (Your garden is still part of your house)

    My shih tzu mix Jackie use to do the same things as your Shiba. Quickly eat stuff off the floor when I can't see, or fight with me when I try to take it out of her mouth. I eventually just took a day or two to walk her past tasty food on the floor, practice the commands, reward with treats and praise. Now a days they do sniff food on the floor but know not to take a bite without my "ok"
  • sunyatasunyata
    Posts: 8548
    Djinn said:

    I can avoid things I can see but I can't check under bushes, in tree roots, under leaves etc. I'm not arguing with you, a shorter leash is sound advice, but perhaps more applicable to an urban setting :)



    This is the exact reason why a shorter leash would be ideal in your situation. If your dog is on a shorter leash, he can not get under bushes, in tree roots, and under leaves unless you are right there with him. Urban setting or no, a shorter leash is always a good idea. Even when I am out in the back country hiking with my dogs, they are on 4 foot leads. So it has nothing to do with whether you are in an urban setting or a more rural setting: A shorter lead allows you to have much more control over what your dog has access to.

    You have been given some excellent advice, so you should be able to work on this issue. But in the mean time, for the safety of your dog, you might want to think about using a shorter leash until he is more reliably trained on the 'leave it' and 'drop it' commands.

    Bella 2Mountains 2Nola 2
    Casey, with Bella and Nola, hanging out in the mountains of Virginia.
    I Wander, I Ride
  • DjinnDjinn
    Posts: 161
    sunyata said:

    If your dog is on a shorter leash, he can not get under bushes, in tree roots, and under leaves unless you are right there with him.


    He was on what I guess would be a 4ft leash (not sure about imperial measurements but the leash is the shortest I could physically use given my hight) when he got the fish. He was sniffing under a bush, I was right by him, just didn't see the fish past the leaves and even if I had seen it the same time he did human reflexes aren't ever going to compete with dog reflexes. OK, I am sounding argumentative now and I don't mean to be, I just want to explain exactly what my situation is. I think perhaps another way of wording what you're saying would be "don't let the dog's head go anywhere you don't have clear unobstructed vision", right? Maybe just keeping him away from leaves and bushes would be the most straightforward thing but it would be taking a big daily pleasure away from him. But then it's pleasure versus safety, which isn't much of a debate. I don't know.

    I think perhaps some other new-ish shibas' people will be able to sympathize with the huge amount of guilt, sadness and frustration that comes from wanting to do the right thing but everything being two steps forward, one step back. I've never felt such a failure or so ineffectual as I do with Hayate, and yet I have never felt such a fierce kind of love. This forum and all the help everyone has offered us has been more important than I can ever say.

  • You could try training him to a basket muzzle and using that on walks until you've proofed "leave it" outside. That should keep him from being able to grab strange stuff that you miss or at least give you time to get him away from it while he tries to figure out how to get it through the muzzle. A dog that goes to our dog park wears a basket muzzle to keep him from eating rocks there (apparently he's had surgery for it before).

    Downside to that, of course, is that many people will probably see the muzzle and assume aggression.
  • curlytailscurlytails
    Posts: 2779
    Ooh, maybe an Oppo Quack muzzle might deter others from assuming he's dangerous AND serve the function notorious described above!

    http://www.t-oppo.jp/quack.html

    I can only sympathize, and don't have any better suggestions than what's already been given. We live in a trashy neighborhood where people are constantly throwing half-gnawed meat bones, etc. wherever they feel like it. It's especially a problem when my low-vision partner walks the dogs at night... even on a short leash. The best we've been able to do is anticipate and avoid (Bowdu offers very subtle hints that he's scouting for scraps instead of a pooping spot). Obviously that is not a foolproof plan. Anyway, I'm glad you're taking the time and effort to figure out what else you can do. This is a hard one.
    image
    Bowdu 寶肚 (Shiba) and Bowpi 寶媲 (Basenji) with M.C.
  • zandramezandrame
    Posts: 1106
    @curlytails, haha! I want one of those! :D
  • redcattooredcattoo
    Posts: 1960
    OMG, that link is just too funny ... yes, it would be hard to assume "aggressive dog stay away" from that type of muzzle ... but easy to assume "crazy owner stay away" instead LOL
  • @curlytails-Thanks so much. I think I will order one for Quake for vet visits. What size is your Shiba and what size muzzle did you order? I want to train him to like the muzzle before I have to use it on him for vet visits.
  • I would like to train Quake to let me put the muzzle on for walks and then also for pet visits. I will not always use it for walks but especially at night when it's hard to see what he is sniffing.
  • sunyatasunyata
    Posts: 8548
    @Antoinette - Unless he is eating something horrible or toxic, I would work on proofing the "Leave It" command instead of using a muzzle. Even if you do opt for the basket muzzle, I would only use it until you work with him further on "Leave It".
    Bella 2Mountains 2Nola 2
    Casey, with Bella and Nola, hanging out in the mountains of Virginia.
    I Wander, I Ride
  • @Sunyata-I think you are right. Thanks for your advise. I have been working with Quake on the "leave it" command on walks and lately he does not get a treat but instead gets verbal praise every time he obeys the command and he is doing very well.
  • sunyatasunyata
    Posts: 8548
    That is good to hear. I would still bring treats with you on walks, especially since an occasional treat reinforces the training and keeps him guessing as to whether or not a "real" treat might be dispensed if he obeys the command. :)
    Bella 2Mountains 2Nola 2
    Casey, with Bella and Nola, hanging out in the mountains of Virginia.
    I Wander, I Ride
  • @sunyata-Excellent idea. Thanks.
  • I am having this problem now with my four-month old. I got bit pretty hard yesterday while trying to control him on a walk. He went nuts over everything on the ground and my neighborhood is dirty! He is still awful on the leash and it is getting harder to train him at all because he refuses the treats! He hates training, so as soon as he figures out what is happening he walks away. Maybe I have to get better treats? I've tried many different things, some he seems to enjoy at first but then gets tired of it. He doesn't hate the treats, he will take them if he has to do nothing, they are just not worth his energy lol.

    "Leave it" at home is pretty easy since he is not even interested in grabbing anything when I'm watching. When we are outside I can't even get him to sit for a treat, he ignores it. Despite the training issue (which is a new problem), he is well-behaved at home, with the occasional naughtiness, but outside he is hard to handle.

    Did anybody have the same kind of experience? How can I train a dog that doesn't want treats?
  • A reward is anything that your dog is interested in at the time.

    Hamilton is the same way when I take him on walks. He is so interested in his environment, that at the beginning, unless I had endless amounts of cheese in my pockets, he would not pay me a bit of attention and pull and run everywhere.

    So what I started doing, if there was something that he really wanted to sniff, he would have to look at me and sit. Instead of a treat as a reward, he got to go sniff the pothole or play with the leaf or sniff the piece of paper on the ground. It took a while, but he soon learned that instead of fighting me to try to get to what he wants, he can sit and ask.

    We live in a littler filled neighborhood and it's difficult to keep him from sniffing and trying to eat everything, but if you teach him to ask first, you can then say yes or no and find something else to reward him. But there will also be some things that he's interested in that's safe to sniff.

    Also, you can reward with a short play session instead of food. I would say think and find out what reward you should use, because not all dogs are food motivated. Hamilton, is generally toy motivated, so if he is giving me a lot of attention on a walk and being well behaved, we get to stop mid walk and play with his favorite toy.

  • I'll try that.

    What worked until last week was to give him a stick to carry. He would carry it for most of the walk. Now he drops it after a block, so it doesn't work very well anymore.
  • LilMooksLilMooks
    Posts: 9
    I call Mookie my little Urban Forager.
  • AntoinetteAntoinette
    Posts: 887
    Quake is also one to pick up stuff on walks so I really have to keep and eye on him and reinforce the "leave it" command. I verbally priase him every time he obeys the "leave it" command. I do let him pick up a stick at the beginning of the walk so he can carry it throughout the rest of the walk and not pick up anything toxic. I tried bringing a toy along but he was no interested in that. He prefers to find his own "treasure" during the walk. I let him keep his treasure until we get home and then trade him for a small treat. I tell him "sit" and "now' let's trade" and he drops the treasure and I give him a treat. I think that is more fair than forcing him to give it up since he's so proud and happy to carry around his treasure.
  • We carry lots of different kinds of treats with us, because Nym only likes a certain kind for so long. The Bravo! Trailmix is hella convenient since it comes with 4 or 5 different kinds already, she never knows what she's gonna get next.
  • When Kiba started picking stuff up on our walks, I really got to train him on the command Leave It. Then he quickly forgot how it was in our puppy class haha.

    I do let him pick up a stick


    Kiba finally started picking up sticks, which is great cause I'll practice drop it...then have him sit and i give him the stick :P

    The one thing i hated was when Kiba would just walk by and instantly grab something and it was a poop...he would just swallow it :( ...he hasnt done this in a while luckily.

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