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Well... it's been some months since I was last here. Had a lot of time to think about having Shibas.
  • My posts when I first came here were kind of dumb lol.

    Anyway... I have had lots of time to think about what such an independent and free-spirited dog entails and still would love to have a Shiba (I would LOVE a dog that has a cat's independence and "I love you but am willing to spend a few hours without you" attitude), if only one could be available near Oregon's Jackson County... I have no car but I do have people who can drive me to the vet's and pet shops and whatnot.

    I considered a Pomeranian but they are probably kind of loud which is kind of bad in an apartment building.

    My job is only 2 hours a day 2 days a week, but not THAT big a financial problem because I am legally disabled so I would like to think I am financially covered.

    Plus they are supposed to be quiet dogs which would be perfect for an apartment building. My place has rules against loud animals.

    I hope this thread does not upset all of you like my first one did. ^^;
    Post edited by shinken_shiba_kaoru at 2013-03-14 05:45:42
  • Cool. :)

    Thanks. :)
  • lucylulucylu
    Posts: 500
    My shiba is far from quiet, and one of the two shibas I'm watching right now is loud too. The third one doesnt make a sound though. Just giving you a heads up.
  • kumaDUDEkumaDUDE
    Posts: 1259
    I don't believe anyone was upset, they just couldn't see the benefit of the mix.

    I read your intro thread and these are just some questions that popped in mind.

    Is this going to be your first dog?
    Are you leaning more towards a puppy or rescue/rehoming?
    Have you ever had a dog before?
    You say you have people who can drive you, is this any hour of the day? Sometimes there are emergencies with dogs that just can't wait.

    I'm hoping you live in a place that allows dogs. Shibas can be loud and can also be obnoxious at times, especially when they have separation anxiety.
    Just some things I figured I would ask
    Post edited by kumaDUDE at 2013-03-14 12:31:29
  • kumaDUDE said:

    I don't believe anyone was upset, they just couldn't see the benefit of the mix.

    I read your intro thread and those are just some questions that popped in mind.



    No, I mean the stuff I posted in in June/July of 2012, when I first discovered the breed. I would rather not reread that stuff but here you go...

    http://www.shibainuforum.org/forum/discussion/10115/hello-fellow-shiba-lovers-d#Item_11

    http://www.shibainuforum.org/forum/discussion/10196/a-couple-of-shiba-questions-#Item_17

    Also I want dogs because as a third floor apartment resident I have no yard for a cat to pee and poop in (and do not want to deal with litter boxes). So naturally I chose a dog that had some catlike behaviors.
    Post edited by shinken_shiba_kaoru at 2013-03-14 12:36:04
  • Is this going to be your first dog? Yes
    Are you leaning more towards a puppy or rescue/rehoming? Adult, possibly rescue, preferably trained
    Have you ever had a dog before? My parents never had dogs, always cats
    You say you have people who can drive you, is this any hour of the day? Sometimes there are emergencies with dogs that just can't wait. oh, I'll have to ask my friend who promised to be there for me, about that before I get a dog I guess
    Post edited by shinken_shiba_kaoru at 2013-03-14 13:00:14
  • kumaDUDEkumaDUDE
    Posts: 1259
    Cool, I wish you the best of luck with finding your new friend/family member.
    Just a forewarning, shibas tend to not want to potty near their home; my pup doesn't like to go anywhere near my apartment complex in SoCal, and will not go #2 in my backyard in NorCal he has to go #2 at the park across the street.
    So be prepared for some of their shiba ways. I suggest reading up more about the breed, especially about how shibas play and how shibas are allergic to a few things.
  • Oh I see, thanks. I read a lot about Shibas... never heard of that stuff.
  • Anyways I would like to think my attitude toward Shibas has matured a lot since June.
  • lucylulucylu
    Posts: 500
    I'll second what kumadude said. Lucy just turned two and she's never went to the bathroom in our yard. The closest is probably a couple houses down, but a lot of the time we have to get a good quarter mile away before she will go.
  • Ah, thanks for telling me that.
  • lucylulucylu
    Posts: 500
    It does sound like your ready and have done a lot of research. The fact your looking for an adult is a plus. Just giving you some first hand experience from our dogs. They seriously are like no other breed you or your friends have seen or had.
  • BootzBootz
    Posts: 3495
    @shinken_shiba_kaoru

    I'm sorry but if you have "read" about shibas and never heard about them not going in their own territory....you have not "read" enough.

    Please take the time and read through all the threads other shiba owners have posted here to expect the worse.

    Like others have mentioned. Some shibas do get separation anxiety and WILL bark/howl up a storm which might get you evicted from your place. Some shibas will not potty within a minimum 3 block radius of the house so you WILL have to walk quite a ways before they will do their business.

    Good Luck
  • SayaSaya
    Posts: 6678
    Saya pee and poo in here yard she does #1 anywhere in it and #2 she will go to the shed or burn pile area which is pretty far away..

    Though some dogs are different.

    Saya only poops in winter in high grass, but in spring, summer, and fall has no issue doing it in low grass it's funny.

    Not every shiba info site or book has that type of shiba quirk info..

    Getting an adult is great as the foster will know the dog's temperament in their home.

    Some breeders will retire their adult dogs into pet homes..
    Photobucket
    Nicole, 5year old Bella(Boxer), and 4year old Saya(Shiba inu)
  • Oh. I read a lot but I guess I didn't read everything. I looked up the description of their behavior at Northwest Shibas4Life. But I did not see anything about them howling up a storm if I went off to work. I guess Shiba adoption sites just give a basic overview to visitors.
  • lucylulucylu
    Posts: 500
    Dogs aren't mechanical toys so nobody can give you an absolute on how they will be. Mine for instance is not a door bolter, has good recall, and can be trusted off leash. Most here and every book will say the exact opposite of shibas. Mine will bark if a dog walks by our house or she hears a loud noise. She'll make other "monkey" like sounds when she's playing.
  • I would hate to pay hundreds on such a beautiful dog only to have to give it to a friend because my going to work and leaving it behind could get me evicted due to noise complaints. :(
  • kumaDUDEkumaDUDE
    Posts: 1259
    Eviction is an extreme, so long as they allow dogs in your complex, you hould get two warnings. Worst case scenario, you can always hire a dog walker or bring the dog to daycare.
    There are always solutions to every problem, just better to be prepared and ready. Always best to expect the unexpected haha, I can tell you I've done a lot just to keep my Kuma, I can also tell you I will do it again if I had the chance. Friends, family, and forum members (friends) also help a lot; so don't be so discouraged, best to just take it one step at a time.
    Maybe you can foster a dog for a few weeks/months and if you love him/her ask to adopt them.
  • kumaDUDE said:

    Eviction is an extreme, so long as they allow dogs in your complex, you hould get two warnings. Worst case scenario, you can always hire a dog walker or bring the dog to daycare.
    There are always solutions to every problem, just better to be prepared and ready. Always best to expect the unexpected haha, I can tell you I've done a lot just to keep my Kuma, I can also tell you I will do it again if I had the chance. Friends, family, and forum members (friends) also help a lot; so don't be so discouraged, best to just take it one step at a time.
    Maybe you can foster a dog for a few weeks/months and if you love him/her ask to adopt them.


    Rules for pet owners, straight from the local housing authority:

    photo IMG_20130314_103704.jpg
  • I think if you're expecting an entirely silent dog, you're not going to get it, especially with a puppy. Dogs will make noise. Especially in the early days when you go to work. Eventually, they will get quieter, but in the beginning,not so much.

    Maybe you can adopt an adult dog? That might help. But I do have to say if you're already thinking you might have to give up a dog if it didn't work out, then you're probably not in the right frame of mind to get a dog. Once you get a dog, you are committed to that dog for life, so you have to make sure you can handle anything. And if you're thinking of buying a Shiba puppy (which I think would be a bad idea in your situation) then you'll be looking at more than a thousand dollars, not a few hundred.

    Also, I don't know about this thing about dogs not pottying in their yard or near there home. I don't think that is a typical Shiba behavior, though obviously some dogs do it. Mine all go in the yard quite fine, and they prefer that to going when they are on a walk.

    I would say meet some Shibas, talk to Shiba people and other dog owners too and find out what it is really like to live with a dog, and keep mulling it over.

    eta: after looking at your lease, I'd say you're not in a good position to have a Shiba right now. And experienced owner might be able to make it work, but even that is iffy.
    Post edited by shibamistress at 2013-03-14 13:41:05
  • I would not part with an expensive dog like that so easily.

    I would try to do what I could to keep it for as long as possible. I would definitely find out what kind of personality the dog had before making a decision. If it is the kind that whined up a storm upon parting with it's owner for more than a few minutes it would not be a good fit for my place probably.

    Hmm... good advice.
    Post edited by shinken_shiba_kaoru at 2013-03-14 13:44:33
  • MackersMackers
    Posts: 73
    I would echo kuma's suggestion to look into fostering as a way to see if a dog is for you regardless of it is a shiba or other breed.
  • Good idea.
  • kumaDUDEkumaDUDE
    Posts: 1259

    I would not part with an expensive dog like that so easily.



    I personally don't like that comment....

    I would suggest looking at another breed, the fact is though, all dogs bark, all puppies cry, no matter how you look at it, if you can't convince your neighbors and management that this separation anxiety will only happen 5min-20min and will decrease as the days progress. I would suggest a new breed, a new apartment, or a new animal.

    It's best to let your property managers know what you are planning. Maybe reach out to your neighbors and let them know your intentions about you adding another family member. I'm sorry if I sound rude in the previous paragraph, but that quote threw me off
    Post edited by kumaDUDE at 2013-03-14 13:54:29
  • I see. So it doesn't last forever. I was picturing non-stop neighbor bothering noise for the whole 2-3 hours I was at work.

    That is a RELIEF!
  • BootzBootz
    Posts: 3495
    Sorry to burst your bubble. But it CAN last forever.

    I took @Tatonka's shiba in when he was on vacation. He has separation anxiety and would howl/bark for hours. I had to bring him to work with me.
  • RikkaRikka
    Posts: 1501
    kumaDUDE said:

    I would suggest a new breed, a new apartment, or a new animal.



    This.

    Also, my Shiba will go in our yard if it's an emergency, but I don't rely on that for everyday measures. If he's whining at the door and walking in circles, and I don't have time to go on a walk at that very moment, I let him go in the side yard and he'll eventually go. But normally, like others have said, I definitely have to walk him in order for him to even go to the bathroom.
    image
    Lauren, living with a 4 y/o Shiba named after a scientist. ☆
  • Oh. Hmm... gonna be a big decision then.
    Post edited by shinken_shiba_kaoru at 2013-03-14 13:58:06
  • Anyways I have to get ready for work. Thanks for the information Northwest Shibas4Life did not provide me for some reason.
    Post edited by shinken_shiba_kaoru at 2013-03-14 14:00:22
  • Re: the bathroom issue, it's not anything that is particularly inherent to a breed a dog, but it is what the dog is used to. Dogs are creatures of habit. so if they usually go on a walk away from home, they may not want to adjust to going in their yard or near home. But if they usually use the yard, then a walk may seem odd to them. It's all what you train them to do, so it's good to get them used to a variety of situations (not that I have! but i do recognize the use of that when I'm traveling and I have another case of "dog won't poop because he's on the leash!" happening!)

    Re: the rest of it, since you're still so new to dogs, I'd spend some time with other dogs for now. Maybe you can volunteer at the shelter and work with some shelter dogs. Hang around other dog people, too, to really hear what life is like with a dog. Foster a dog if possible (though it does sound like your lease won't allow that?). It might be helpful to get a better sense of what life with a dog is life well before trying to get one. Some dogs will howl/cry/bark for hours. Others don't. Shibas are not, actually, particularly quiet (but quieter than say, hounds or terriers).

    Also, I'd really, really recommend an adult dog for you not a puppy.
  • If it is is immature enough to whine and scream nonstop, that is to say under the mental age of a 4 or 5 year old child.... I can't take care of it, just not able to. So yeah I would want to adopt an adult dog.

    On second thought scratch that I need to work around dogs before I say those things.
    Post edited by shinken_shiba_kaoru at 2013-03-14 14:05:30
  • And later, don't want to be late for work.
  • Anyways I have to get ready for work. Thanks for the information Northwest Shibas4Life did not provide me for some reason.



    If you are doing the entirety of your research based on that website and this forum, you are not doing enough research, nor should you be blaming that site for it.

    I'm going to be incredibly blunt but I'll try to be civil about it.

    I don't think you are ready in the least for a dog. It's not responsible to consider getting a dog in your current living situation given the rules in your apartment, nor contemplate getting your dog when you have not yet determined whether you will be able to bring the dog to the vet, emergency vet, or other locations that require a car. Not that you need a car to be a responsible owner, but these are things you should have already planned and should know. Being a responsible dog owner means being able to take care of the dog and handle the situation even in the worst case scenario. You don't seem to have even thought about it and you've taken a chastising tone regarding that site because forum members have brought up the fact that dogs are individuals and may not wholly conform to breed description and the site (a general information source) has not described these thngs.

    If you're unwilling to have a cat because you dislike the inconvenience of having a litter box in your apartment you need to seriously rethink getting a dog (never mind a shiba). Shibas are generally acknowledged as dogs that as a rule can be tremendously infuriating, and troublesome (not just inconvenient). A lot of that is offset by the charm of their usually engaging and eccentric personalities, but that is also for owners who come in knowing that taking care of training one of these breeds is a pain and accept that ahead of time. Even amongst those that have other nihon ken, they are generally considered the most difficult of breeds. Many of those folks (posters on this forum) love their shibas, but would never get one again.

    What are you going to do when your shiba starts screaming because you're trimming nails, or giving it a bath? Or when the dog cries in it's crate when you leave or even when you just return?

    Are you going to be ok if your dog ends up being sick, crying the whole while you are gone (because it doesn't feel well), has diarrhea, freaks out, eats it to clean it up while your gone, then vomits it all back up onto the carpet (of your rented apartment) several hours later? Do you have a group of friends willing to take you to the vet etc. whenever neccesary? If you only have one, they will get tired of it soon enough so you'll need to rotate. In case of emergency or travel will you be able to get your dog to a boarding facility or have a group of friends who can take your dog while you're gone? Because inevitably you will have a friend who loves your dog (and whom your dog loves) who will watch them briefly and return your dog saying "I'm sorry but I can never watch your dog ever again. Also, I don't love her anymore." Or a close friend that demurs from watching your dog because, "[W]hile I love your dog, she makes me feel bad so I can't really watch her unless it's an absolute emergency."

    Before you contemplate getting a dog you need to be mentally prepared and know what you'll do if the dog doesn't follow expectations, or if the worst case scenario happens. If you end up getting a hellion (possible with a shiba) are you prepared? Incidentally, the screaming and whining non-stop? With a shiba it could be due not to immaturity but because they know that's how to get you to give in to what they want. Having a shiba can very well turn into a battle of wills (especially with inexperienced dog owners) and shibas have an impressive arsenal of weapons at their disposal.

    I apologize for being harsh. I think it's clear you have good intentions, but I honestly believe you are currently very unprepared and I'm passionate enough about the breed to not want to see another shiba go into rescue. I think you need to think a lot more about your own situation, the realities of dog ownership, and the realities of shiba ownership and ask yourself some hard questions.

    [edited for typos]
    Post edited by violet_in_seville at 2013-03-14 15:16:42
  • lindsaytlindsayt
    Posts: 4785
    Northwest Shibas 4 Life is an excellent rescue that I am proud to work with. There is no need whatsoever to take a swipe at them because you didn't do all your research yet. They do not adopt to people in apartments as far as I know, for the reasons mentioned above.

    A Pomeranian would not be a good fit for someone in an apartment with such noise restrictions (I had a Pom for 16 years).

    Even tho you don't like litter boxes, a cat may be the better option...there are litter genies and self cleaning boxes...
    "Common sense isn't so common"
    photo c5d87957-61b6-48af-a440-4187cbfc861b_zps88ccdf88.jpg
  • lucylulucylu
    Posts: 500
    Just so everyone knows she has stated that she wants to get an adult dog and not a puppy. So while changes could still happen and a new living situation could change the dogs behavior it's not like she's getting a puppy where god knows what it will turn out to be like. I do applaud her for that.
  • @lucylu - I noticed that s/he said s/he was interested in an adult, but I think the questions I asked still hold true. I am glad s/he has thought about that aspect though.

    I think that making sure you have the resources to deal with training, veterinary care, travel, etc. is important regardless of the age of the dog. It may be slightly less financially onerous with an adult, but no less important. I know you know that as well, but it's not clear to me that the original poster understands how troublesome these dogs can really be.

    I'm an experienced spitz owner, my partner was not. He loves and adores our two but does not want a shiba again. No amount of mental preparation I put him through actually made him wholly prepared for the difficulty of living with a primitive breed and our girl (whom he helped raise) continues to push his boundaries daily. Honestly, for a spitz I think she is comparatively easy. I think even for one with experience, that shibas are a lot of work and take a lot of resources (physical, financial, mental, emotional). They really aren't for everyone. @shinken_shiba_kaoru has stated that s/he has a limited number of resources. I think that s/he just really needs to spend more time thinking about what it is that s/he want, what it is that s/he can provide, and see if these things match up in non-ideal situations, not just ideal ones.

    [edited to correct my poor grammar and for clarification]
    Post edited by violet_in_seville at 2013-03-14 15:49:17
  • JuniJuni
    Posts: 1269
    Well, it's hard for me to tell if you write some stuff as a joke, or because you like to banter or maybe a case of writing before thinking. But you have to understand that some comments are difficult to accept for dog owners. We don't want to give up our dogs because of the price of the dog but because they are deeply loved family members. Dogs don't bark because they are immature but various reasons such as being scared, worried or wanting to alert you on sth etc.
    I also think it would be a good idea to volunteer at a shelter or help any dog owning friend out to get a better feel for what it is like to own a dog.
    My shiba is rather quiet and is fine being alone, I think most dogs can be trained to be ok home alone. If you talk to the neighbours I would hope they could be understanding in the beginning if you do get a dog and it does bark a bit.
    But a good dog is a tired dog and most Shibas are energetic little creatures that enjoy long walks and activities and can get up to lots of mischief if they don't get it.
  • Sarah_Jay12Sarah_Jay12
    Posts: 316
    I absolutely recommend that a dog - especially a Shiba - is not in your best interest at this current point in time.

    1.) My husband and I lived in an apartment when we first brought our 8 week old pup Maggie home, and it was a rough transition. Thankfully, our leasing office and manager was in love with her, so when we got noise complaints, they let it go as her "just being young" and stood up for us every step of the way. But it couldn't have been easy on our neighbors. We lived in an upstairs apartment, and when we would leave to go to work or something, we could hear her *literally* screaming from down in the parking lot. It couldn't have been easy on our neighbors. However, since you are considering an adult, I think that is a good step forward. Now that Maggie is almost a year, she has really cut down on the screaming. We live in a house now, but we no longer worry about passers-by hearing her and being worried. But each dog is different. If you were so unfortunate as to get an older dog with a slight bit of separation anxiety, the picture you posted of your office pet rules does not seem very forgiving...

    2.) Each person's financial situation is a different story. My husband and I are fortunate to have money in savings for emergency situations with Maggie and our kitten also, but I know people that now have 2 dogs they have adopted with no regular veterinarian, no preventative medicine (Heartgard/Frontline/Revolution/etc.) and are constantly complaining if something goes wrong how they have no idea how they will pay for it. Part of my concern comes from your first post saying that you "like to THINK" you are financially stable. There is a major difference between being able to afford adopting/purchasing a dog AT THIS MOMENT and being financially stable enough to care for the animal for up to 20 years of that animal's life. You are making not only an emotional committment, but also a financial committment that you need to be 100% prepared for. Anything could happen.

    3.) In following my previous point, and your concern for not having your own transportation, can I please reiterate that ANYTHING can happen and you need to be prepared and ready for any possible emergency that requires you to get your dog to the vet. Just the other night, as we were cooking dinner, I noticed our kitten's eye was completely grey, swollen, cloudy, and she couldn't keep it open. We put our dinner on pause and literally ran out the door with her (she and Maggie had just been playing and we were terrified her eye had gotten scratched) to the emergency vet. Turns out: just a bad feline herpes flare-up. We spent about $200 that night for the late-night exam, a stain for her eye to check for a scratched cornea, and two different types of medicines. Anyways, I'm grateful that my husband was home at the time - as we are currently sharing a car. However, our city has multiple taxi services available. If my husband had had the car, I would not have any issue getting a taxi to come pick us up, but that is not always ideal. Does your city have taxis? Unless you have a solid agreement with someone that they will ALWAYS be there for you when you need them and can virtually be an emergency chauffeur, I would perhaps try to get your own mode of transportation.

    I think it's great that you are making changes to your way of thinking and that you are seriously considering all possibilities of the situation. There are too many posters who have confrontational "questions" but do not change their way of thinking - against the entire thread's sound advice. So kudos to you. :)
  • I watched this thread between tasks at work. While I was thinking up a reply... I realized why I wanted a dog so badly.

    I am 27 and single, and not an attractive prospect to most women simply because of how society likes to judge people.

    I see...

    So all 3 happinesses are being deprived of me...

    I want a girlfriend or wife... but ah... when I was 7 or 8 my brain had some seeds of gender-non-conforming tendencies. At 24 they sprouted... and by now they are fully grown... at any given time I can be simply not quite male, or so far female as to be transgendered, or anywhere inbetween. Heck I have no trouble slipping into a more feminine mindset but doing the same for a purely male mindset is pretty much impossible. Yeah, the ladies want a boyfriend who might become their girlfriend.

    I also want kids. But what parent would want to sign his or her son or daughter over to a single man, with no religion, who might go trassexual, let alone one who has never even dated?

    Lastly I want a pet. Specifically a dog because of it's unconditional loyalty. A dog's love is pure and unjudging. I could be a Martian and a dog would not care as long as I was kind and loving to it, but I could not say the same thing about people. And of all the dog breeds I have learned about, the Shiba has the most attractive qualities. Being that a dog is probably the one thing I could have in my city that would be guaranteed to love me unconditionally... I would do anything I could for it. The problem with my housing is I was on a 2 year waiting list and if I were to move somewhere else, somewhere more dog friendly, I would have to stay with a friend until I was at the top of another waiting list.

    There, I just confessed to a lot of unflattering stuff. Also, realizing that stuff all at once has put me in a somewhat unhappy mood. :'(
  • kumaDUDEkumaDUDE
    Posts: 1259
    Like we stated, we are not judging you as a person, we are trying to invoke (if that's the right word I'm looking for) you to seeig things in a different manner. We want you to see the difficulties of raising any dog.
    If you truly wish to get a dog, we suggested several things you can do to assess your situation and hope you can see why you need to think things through.

    Someone suggested helping your local shelter, I think you just giving a few hours a day at the shelter will give you an idea of behaviors you can have with dogs. Walking a dog in itself can be a handful.

    You also stated you didn't want to clean a litter box, how do you feel about picking up a weak stomached dogs #2?

    There are just so many things you have to think about. This isn't just about expense or time, it's a living creature that relies solely on you.
  • I am sorry for opening the floodgates. Just that a lot of unpleasant stuff hit me at once. ^^;
  • kumaDUDE said:

    Like we stated, we are not judging you as a person, we are trying to invoke (if that's the right word I'm looking for) you to seeig things in a different manner. We want you to see the difficulties of raising any dog.
    If you truly wish to get a dog, we suggested several things you can do to assess your situation and hope you can see why you need to think things through.

    Someone suggested helping your local shelter, I think you just giving a few hours a day at the shelter will give you an idea of behaviors you can have with dogs. Walking a dog in itself can be a handful.

    You also stated you didn't want to clean a litter box, how do you feel about picking up a weak stomached dogs #2?

    There are just so many things you have to think about. This isn't just about expense or time, it's a living creature that relies solely on you.



    I do see things in a different manner now. And I would like to work with dogs. A shelter would be a good place to do so. And a weak stomached dog... if I have to do it I have to do it. Realizing what I realized, I would probably be much more devoted to an animal than I would have been prior.
  • lucylulucylu
    Posts: 500
    That was pretty deep right there. This forum comes off a little "strong" sometimes and even I've gotten into it with a couple posters, but in the end everyone just wants to make sure the owners of this breed and this breed are put in the best situation possible.

    Shiba's are great dogs. I would probably never own a different breed besides maybe another Nihon Ken. They are a different kind of dog from the dogs most people are used to though. If you do your research and understand your responsiblitlies of taking care of a living creature that will love you unconditionally then I think you should continue in your search for a Shiba. The only harsh thing I will say, is stay with your midset of getting an adult dog. A puppy would be a horrible situation for you.

    As far as everything else, this forum is full of all different kinds of people from different ethnicity's, cultures, and lifestyles. We can give you a vast array of knowledge about this breed. Just understand that it isn't always going to come across as nicely as you may want it and not all dogs are the same. Like I said, some people think it's crazy to let a Shiba off leash, but there are a few here that have great off leash dogs.

    I hope you get dog, truthfully. Just be prepared that you will be taking care of this animal through sickness and in health for the next 10-15 years, though. This dog will love you unconditionally and we all want you to do the same to it.
  • kumaDUDEkumaDUDE
    Posts: 1259
    Keep us posted, try the shelter idea, they always can use a helping hand. Most shelter staff are very friendly, who knows, you may even find that perfect dog just for you.
    Just don't adopt every dog you fall in love with while working, I don't think your apartment will appreciate it.
  • Thanks. You know, I COULD at any time have gotten a cat... but as much as I like cats I don't think there is as much love behind a cat cuddling up to it's owner as there is a selfish request for attention. Heck, cats can and will make an abrasive noise just to sucker you into being extra nice when they don't really need to be given extra food and the like.

    A dog's love feels much more genuine to me.
  • lucylulucylu
    Posts: 500
    Shiba's will make weird noises to sucker you into giving them food too. Just so you know lol
  • ah thanks for the warning
  • MikoMiko
    Posts: 225
    Im glad that you are taking everyones comments in stride and I believe that working at a shelter or somewhere similar would be a great learning experience.
    Hey, you may even fall in love with one of the dogs there and be able to save a life :)

    Either way, whatever you decide, no one here is judging you personally. Everyone just wants to make sure you make the right decisions and for the right reason. I think that once you gain more knowledge about owning a dog it would be a great addition and benefit to your life.
  • @shinken_shiba_kaoru - thanks for sharing, and thanks for not just running out and getting a dog on impulse, but taking the time to do some research and ask questions. I don't think you're ready yet but I do think you're taking steps in the right direction and I think that's great for you and your future pet. Working with a shelter sounds like a great start.

    Just an observation - if you want unconditional love and loyalty, shibas really may not be the best choice. There are certain,y loving shibas out there. But on the whole as a breed they are not the most expressive with their love, and I honestly don't think it's unconditional. It's why they're a breed that's particularly bad with aversive training. Since you haven't mentioned, I don't know if you're ok with a dog that is loving but not affectionate. I also mention this because it is one of the primary reasons that my partner does not want another shiba in our lives for the future. He knows he is loved but after living with them for several years he knows that he wants a dog that is more openly affectionate.

    As for the other aspects of your personal life, I know it is beyond the topic of this forum, but I wanted to say, don't give up hope. Though not everyone may be accepting there are many who are, and you can find them out there. If you live in a major city there are groups of people you can meet, and resources available, it just takes a bit more searching. There are a lot of people out there who don't fall into the neat categories set forth by heteronormativity and while it isn't as easy as it could or should be, they do find successful and happy relationships. Good luck to you for all your endeavors.
  • ah, sorry to gush like that...

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