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Yearly Vaccinations
  • BitiBeaBitiBea
    Posts: 234
    Everyone has their own opinions on Vaccines for their dog(s). The first set of shots are mandatory (in MOST opinions). What about the yearly DA2PP(Distemper, Adenovirus, Parvovorius, Parainfluenza Virus)...

    Do you get your dogs their annual shots or do you stick with the first set and let it go from there?

    Personally I don't Vaccinate my dogs every year. I keep up with the 3 year Rabies and the occasional deworming. I don't believe to get them a vaccine for the DA2PP or Bordatella every year though.

    What are your thoughts?
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  • SayaSaya
    Posts: 6678
    There's some links with info on some people's views on it.

    This is one and there are others I forgot..
    http://www.itsfortheanimals.com/DODDS-CHG-VACC-PROTOCOLS.HTM

    Photobucket
    Nicole, 5year old Bella(Boxer), and 4year old Saya(Shiba inu)
  • I vaccinate every year. I've never seen anything that I find very compelling that suggests yearly vaccines are particularly harmful (imo there's a lot of loose correlation being equated with causation and since a lot of the hype seems to come from the BS human stuff, I'm very skeptical). I will probably get him the three year rabies vaccine, though, and get the 3 year registration, since that's exactly the same as the 1 year.

    We did have a cat that we didn't vaccinate for the last couple years of his life (ages 16-18). He had kidney disease and had stroked a couple of times and we just didn't think his health was up to it (the vet agreed). He was not allowed outside of the back yard and we vaccinated the other 3 cats religiously to help protect him. One of the other 3 was the same age as him and healthy as a horse, so she kept getting vaccinated yearly.
  • BootzBootz
    Posts: 3495
    I vaccinate them every year. I also have not heard anything bad about keeping them vaccinated and would rather be safe than sorry. We frequent the dog park often and I don't want to risk it. Also, the groomers require rabies certification as well as proof that our dog is up to date on shots.
  • tatonkatatonka
    Posts: 1210
    Yeah I'm that guy. Vet techs find me annoying.
    image
    Monkey!
  • jennajenna
    Posts: 154
    I do rabies every three years per the law in my state, although, Secret is getting her last rabies vax next month. She's 12 and I have no intention of vaccinating her again at 15.

    I have my dogs titered to check distemper and parvo antibody levels every two years and only vaccinate as necessary. Snick got a distemper/parvo vax in January 2011; the one before that was in February 2005. I adopted Secret in October 2006. I've had her titered twice since then and she has not needed to be vaccinated. If you titer and they don't need it, why do it?

    I do NOT vaccinate for Bordetella. The virus that causes Bordetella, or "kennel cough," mutates just like our cold and flu viruses and the vaccination is formulated based on previous strains. My dogs have good immune systems… they will be exposed naturally and will build their own immunity before they would be exposed via a vaccination anyway. This is basically the doggy version of the common cold, which is not going to kill them… in my opinion the benefit of the vaccination does not outweigh the risk.
    jenna -> founder of nyc shiba rescue, inc.
    snickers -> master of shiba mind control
    jennaandsnickers.com
  • BitiBeaBitiBea
    Posts: 234
    @Tatonka - Why would tech's find you annoying? I would find you extremely useful. I just finished doing a TON of vaccine reminders and phone calls for people because they can't remember/dont keep track of what their dog needs lol.
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  • BitiBeaBitiBea
    Posts: 234
    @Jenna - titer tests I think are a great way to go. It can be expensive but saves money in the long run. I would hate to unnecessarily vaccinate my dogs. Even if there is no compelling theory why vaccines are bad.

    One thing that is great about yearly vaccines though is it gets people in to see the vet. Even without annual vaccinations it's still important to get the yearly exam.
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    (¸.•´ (¸.•` Kismet & BitiBea~*.
  • jennajenna
    Posts: 154
    @BitiBea, I keep a spreadsheet for each of my dogs that details their entire medical history and tracks when they need to go in next. They go in yearly for a checkup, even though they only get titered every couple years. These dogs are so stoic... I'd rather have them checked our regularly than take the chance that something could be wrong with them and I don't know it!
    jenna -> founder of nyc shiba rescue, inc.
    snickers -> master of shiba mind control
    jennaandsnickers.com
  • We do have threads about this but it's hard to find without the advanced search function. However, here are some notes about why yearly vacs are a bad idea:

    Here is a link to an article by Dr. Dodds on vaccinations (it’s pretty technical, but useful information): http://www.dogs4dogs.com/blog/2009/08/06/treating-adverse-vaccine-reactions-by-jean-dodds-dvm/

    Here is a link to breeds predisposed to problems, and what those can be, and it includes a discussion of Akitas: http://www.dogsadversereactions.com/vaccinePredisposed.html
    Dr. Dodds notes the small orginal gene pool of the Akita as a possible reason for predisposition to problems (as well as other inheritable conditions) and I think that would also be true of other Japanese breeds.

    This article: http://www.oes.org/page2/19365~2008_RABIES_Vaccine-JAVMA_Report_Adverse_Reactions_in_Dogs.html discusses averse reactions to the rabies vaccine, and ties that to vet journal articles (so it is well researched). It also notes, about half way down the page, how the lump from the vaccine can be benign, but there are cases of fibrosarcomas developing at the injection site. I read another article that says, well, they can't prove the rabies vaccine cause the cancer even if it is in the same spot, and I guess that's true, but for me? The coincidence would be a bit too much for me to consider vaccinating my dog again.

    There was a video posted on this too, from an expert in the field from UMich. When I have more time I'll link it.

    The basic point is dogs do not need yearly vaccinations, and even most of the vet associations have suggested going to every three years. Also, my last blog entry (linked below) discusses why it is neither necessary nor a good idea, with more links.
  • BitiBeaBitiBea
    Posts: 234
    @Jenna - Agreed :)

    I am very lucky that Kismet see's a Veterinarian everyday. It's also great to have help with nail trims lol.
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  • BitiBeaBitiBea
    Posts: 234
    Thanks Shibamistress!
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  • And I finally found the video I was looking for, which is very good and very compelling on why yearly vaccinations are not needed. It was in the canine influenza thread, though, so no wonder we wouldn't be able to find it! I think it will be useful to have it linked here, and perhaps this thread can be more of a go-to thread on such information. The whole thread is interesting and is here:

    http://www.shibainuforum.org/forum/discussion/10649/canine-influenza/p1

    The video is here: http://youtu.be/L1Xd5ghnlJ4

    The thing is, there is plenty of proof that like humans, they do not need to be vaccinated every year, and that they are in fact protected from disease. As the doctor in the video states, this has been known for years--he first came to this conclusion in the 1970s and then did in fact document it. As for causation between over vaccination and health effects, I can't really judge the efficacy of those studies, but that's where I say "better safe than sorry" because if the vaccinations are not necessary, I do not want to give them to my dogs, especially since I know that some japanese breeds (like Akitas) have averse reactions to vaccinations, and I've seen it in my Shiba. So I just don't do it. And my vet also feels that there is no need for me to continue to vaccinate an adult dog. (We do rabies as required by law, though).
    Post edited by shibamistress at 2013-01-31 15:29:36
  • BootzBootz
    Posts: 3495
    @Shibamistress,

    I think you mentioned before that instead of proof of vaccinations, a person can bring in the test results from the titer tests right?

    Just curious, how much a titer test cost usually?
  • It depends on who is accepting them--some people will accept titer tests, some will not. This is a reason that people may have to vaccinate more often though--if they need to board dogs or take them some place that will not accept titer tests. How much they cost depends on the lab doing the work. I don't do it anymore--I don't see the need, and I don't board my dogs. But from my vet it is about $60.

    Hemopet does it, too. Their rates are available online, and you can have your vet draw the blood and send it to them.

    eta: on a side note, when we discussed this on the NK side, the europeans were horrified that vets here recommended yearly vaccinations. It's not done in Europe at all--every three years, apparently at most (which is actually what some vet associations now recommend), and they were just appalled that we would do it more often.
    Post edited by shibamistress at 2013-01-31 15:33:38
  • BitiBeaBitiBea
    Posts: 234
    @Shibamistress - My vet is from Romania. He never encyearly vaccineourages s unless people want them. I know some vets can be quite pushy about it :S I'm glad he's not.

    He was also appalled at the Spay/Neuter procedures in the U.S. and Canada...
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    (¸.•´ (¸.•` Kismet & BitiBea~*.
  • jennajenna
    Posts: 154
    @bootz @shibamistress Luckily, I've never had an issue with having titer results accepted as "proof of vaccinations."
    jenna -> founder of nyc shiba rescue, inc.
    snickers -> master of shiba mind control
    jennaandsnickers.com
  • ArcticArctic
    Posts: 513
    I always laugh yet become annoyed when people from Latin America or Europe marvel at the American insistence to spay/neuter your pet when many parts of both of those regions are chock full of stray dogs. Do they not a correlation? And yes, I have traveled extensively in Europe and have family in Latin America and thus have been down there many, many times.

    Sansa is eight months old, so she's obviously been vaccinated up the wazoo with puppy shots. I think going forward she will probably get yearly vaccines unless I ever find hard evidence that proves that it's unhealthy.

    We get them for free since my girlfriend works at an animal hospital, so unless I find something that says it's unhealthy it's better safe than sorry as far as I'm concerned.
    Post edited by Arctic at 2013-01-31 16:10:27
  • BitiBeaBitiBea
    Posts: 234
    The problem my Veterinarian has isn't with spaying and neutering. It's spaying and neutering at an age before the animal is fully developed.
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    (¸.•´ (¸.•` Kismet & BitiBea~*.
  • My vet always wants to shoot my dog with everything under the sun from Bordetella to Lyme. Last year I said no to everything but Lyme (because we are tick city) and rabies because it's required. My dog is never around other dogs. How is he going to catch kennel cough??
  • sunyatasunyata
    Posts: 8583
    @Arctic - @shibamistress posted some really good links as to why yearly vaccinations are not necessary and can in some cases be incredibly unhealthy.

    We do have threads about this but it's hard to find without the advanced search function. However, here are some notes about why yearly vacs are a bad idea:

    Here is a link to an article by Dr. Dodds on vaccinations (it’s pretty technical, but useful information): http://www.dogs4dogs.com/blog/2009/08/06/treating-adverse-vaccine-reactions-by-jean-dodds-dvm/

    Here is a link to breeds predisposed to problems, and what those can be, and it includes a discussion of Akitas: http://www.dogsadversereactions.com/vaccinePredisposed.html
    Dr. Dodds notes the small orginal gene pool of the Akita as a possible reason for predisposition to problems (as well as other inheritable conditions) and I think that would also be true of other Japanese breeds.

    This article: http://www.oes.org/page2/19365~2008_RABIES_Vaccine-JAVMA_Report_Adverse_Reactions_in_Dogs.html discusses averse reactions to the rabies vaccine, and ties that to vet journal articles (so it is well researched). It also notes, about half way down the page, how the lump from the vaccine can be benign, but there are cases of fibrosarcomas developing at the injection site. I read another article that says, well, they can't prove the rabies vaccine cause the cancer even if it is in the same spot, and I guess that's true, but for me? The coincidence would be a bit too much for me to consider vaccinating my dog again.

    There was a video posted on this too, from an expert in the field from UMich. When I have more time I'll link it.

    The basic point is dogs do not need yearly vaccinations, and even most of the vet associations have suggested going to every three years. Also, my last blog entry (linked below) discusses why it is neither necessary nor a good idea, with more links.



    As for me, other than the puppy round of vaccines, my two have only had the required 3 year rabies. However, from this point forward, only Bella will be getting the rabies shot, if needed (titer testing will be done on both dogs). Nola, due to her health issues is not able to receive ANY vaccinations.

    My vet is adamantly against yearly vaccinations and will only do them if the client insists that they want them (or if the client needs them for group activities, etc.).
    Bella 2Mountains 2Nola 2
    Casey, with Bella and Nola, hanging out in the mountains of Virginia.
    I Wander, I Ride
  • ArcticArctic
    Posts: 513
    @sunyata thank you for pointing those out. I will read them ASAP. Thanks!
  • Jade is vaccinated for everything as she is still young and I do not trust the immunity just yet. She goes to Rally class and will be going to trials so yes she is vaccinated for Kennel Cough. I might discontinue the Lepto vaccine since I do not allow her near stagnant water. I have had two dogs come down positive for lyme (both were not vaccinated for it), so Jade will be vaccinated for lyme. I am thinking about using titers for DHPP and possibly the other vaccines when she is old enough in my opinion to have built a sufficient immunity.
    Owned and loved by "Jade"
    ~ DOB: 5/18/11~ Cream Shiba ~
  • The video is particularly good and explains the issues well. The vet interviewed is a leading expert in canine immunology, and is very mainstream (some people think Dr. Dodds, who is referred to in other links, is too "out there" because she stresses holistic health. I do not agree that she is out there, but even people who disagree with her, should have fewer problems with the vet in the video).
  • LosechLosech
    Posts: 2516
    I do minimal vaccines. I find it unnecessary to vaccinate every year when vaccines can last a minimum of five years, most longer. But I do not think that they are eeevil, just way overused.

    I do parvo/distemper as pups (yes, that's it), then rabies when the law requires it, then another parvo/distemper at one year, no more vaccines until the dog is middle aged, then one last parvo(depends on the area)/distemper vaccine. I do 3 year rabies as required by law.
    I do not do that titers thing.
  • TengaiTengai
    Posts: 275
    Ditto to what Losech said above.
    I travel a lot with my dogs, dog shows camping etc. Exposed I'm sure to many bad things!
    The only instance of parvo was a pup we placed who was bombarded by vaccines as a pup(multiple shots at a time) Actually a forum members dog. She came down with parvo as a young adult. Recovered thankfully! I truly believe is was from over vaccinating/multiple vaccines per visit.
    Phil
  • Thanks for posting about this on your blog, Lisa. I hope a lot of people read it. I discussed with my dog vet about no more vaccinations, and she agreed, except did point out that getting rabies every 3 years would wise, only due to the legal ramifications if not done. So I will probably keep doing the rabies every 3 years for my dogs only. She advised no more vaccinations at all for my cats (who are indoor only). I'm so happy she feels the same about vaccinations, and I am now going to use her for cats also.
  • amtiamti
    Posts: 1066
    My dogs have been vaccinated with the usual rabies and puppy shots, no Bordetella though. My vets in our area no longer recommend the three year rabies shot saying it was causing problems in some animals (can't remember what it was exactly) so we do annual on all our animals. We live next to woods so rabies is a must. I do push the dates out by a couple of months and do not use flea products unless needed, which is really maybe once a year or so. I don't even apply the entire dosage because those medications scare me more than fleas. I also give heart worm medication every other month in the winter, and monthly during the summer.
  • TengaiTengai
    Posts: 275
    Forgot to mention above, I also do not give flea/tick topical meds. I agree they are toxic although only given on the skin, they are absorbed into the body. Since being in Shiba's(almost 9 years now) we never had fleas, although an occasional tick we have seen even with all the dogs shows/camping trips etc. We do give heartworm meds, usually every month and a half to two months year round.
  • Its soo good to read about conscious pet owners here who are becoming more and more aware of over vaccination. Truth4Pets offers evidence-based info to reduce vaccine load. I lost a pet after more than two vaccines. Cat died 2 days later. Watch this 3-minute video on pet vaccine reactions http://youtu.be/2nZ5m5uzzac
  • SayaSaya
    Posts: 6678
    Well I'll be going to the vet for heartguard and Saya hasn't had the combo shots last year.. I'm hoping to not do them again this year and then do them next year as then it'd be the third year.

    I hope the vet won't push it to hard or try secretly give it to her.

    He doesn't push the kibble he sells so I hope he respects my choices. I plan to print out info in case it's needed..

    If you do no vaccines besides rabies or every three years does your vet try push it or does they respect your choices?

    I like my vet, but they're more into vaccine everything every year besides rabies which they do every three years.

    Saya is very healthy so I think her immune is hardy enough.

    She also got lethargic when she did get the vaccines next day she bounced back.
    Photobucket
    Nicole, 5year old Bella(Boxer), and 4year old Saya(Shiba inu)
  • My vet is pretty good at doing what I want even when we disagree, but we don't actually disagree about the vaccinations, so I'm lucky there!
  • curlytailscurlytails
    Posts: 2779
    @saya, Heh, I was just through this with Bowpi, updating her 3-year rabies. Honestly, this is the first vet we've had a longer term relationship with since moving here. I quit several vets before settling on this one for the past 2.5 years because it was important to me to have a vet I could trust and talk to, who WON'T push tests and vaccines on me. We just got her rabies, and the vet tech looked at her records and simply asked, "Have we spoken to you about the other vaccines we offer?" I responded, "Yes, I'm aware and we prefer a mInimal vaccine regimen." and that was that. Perfect.

    Every now and then we'll encounter a more enthusiastic tech who will try to push, but the vets themselves do not. I think if you're worried that the vet will "secretly" try to vaccinate your dog, that's sort of a warning that maybe you can find a better vet?
    image
    Bowdu 寶肚 (Shiba) and Bowpi 寶媲 (Basenji) with M.C.
    Post edited by curlytails at 2013-03-16 17:37:59
  • We just update Zim's vaccines this year. They automatically gave us the three year vaccine for rabies, which was what I wanted, and then said to me, "He's due for a lot of vaccines today. Are you okay with them all being given together or would you like to schedule some more visits for them to be given separately." I said I wanted them all today, and she made sure that he had never had any problems with vaccines before first. I was very appreciative as these are not exactly the sort of concerns you expect a Banfield vet to have.
  • tatonkatatonka
    Posts: 1210
    This is an interesting thread. Thanks @shibamistress for the research links. Tatonka's 1 year vaccination milestone is coming up and I'd like to minimize the risk to him.

    Some vaccinations I do have to give him because I travel for work and he needs to be boarded during those times. I mark those required ones in the "Inn" column. He hasn't needed to fly yet so I'll probably ignore the "Air" column (I posted a picture of my spreadsheet way up there ^^^).
    Monkey!
    Post edited by tatonka at 2013-03-17 10:09:01
  • SayaSaya
    Posts: 6678
    I don't think it's reason to switch vets as I don't know his take on vaccines. I plan print out info and if he does push I have no choice for vaccine then I will switch vets.

    I'm just saying that as I know of someone on a forum who had that issue with their vet.

    Since Saya is pretty healthy I don't visit the vet often except to get frontline for Bella or heartguard.

    Saya was in last for rabies or fecal test or whatever..

    Mainly was asking for people's experience with their vet and how they handle things if you do minimum vaccines. When I schedule visit I plan to ask how he feels about minimum vaccines.

    Photobucket
    Nicole, 5year old Bella(Boxer), and 4year old Saya(Shiba inu)
  • HaloHalo
    Posts: 278
    I did a ton of research on vaccines before getting Halo. Based upon all the info I have seen pro and against yearly vaccines, I have decided that I am not willing to take the risk of hurting my dog by vaccinating her yearly. Another website I found that I didn't see on here in called truth4dogs. Gives a lot of info about vaccines and why it isn't necessary to vaccinate every year. I don't do bortetella or lyme, as for my area it isn't necessary, but I did have the lepto only because that is a common issues in our area, and I don't want either of us sick. I want to do titer testing for my dog every few years, but the vet charges an outrages 120 dollars to test against only distemper and parvo. Its even more if you want to know any other shot immunity. They are also very pro shots, and I get that, and science diet, and revolution shoved down my throat my vet techs when I'm there, actual vet doesn't do that tho. I'm hoping they respect my wishes that halo won't be vaccinated yearly. Also, what are your thoughts on revolution? I hadn't really seen anything in the forum? Maybe some thread is buried really deep?
  • jennajenna
    Posts: 154
    @Halo $120 isn't really a lot for distemper & parvo titer testing. I just paid more than that for titers on my youngest Shiba and I'm currently living in the sticks where everything is super cheap. It is definitely more costly than vaccinating, but it's well worth it. I do it every three years unless I get a borderline result, in which case I test again the next year.
    jenna -> founder of nyc shiba rescue, inc.
    snickers -> master of shiba mind control
    jennaandsnickers.com
  • Kira is a year and 3 months old and her yearly rabies vaccination is due in October.The other two vaccines they have her up for are Lyme, Distemper, and Bordetella. I think I will opt out of the Bordetella though - heard way too many horror stories about it.

    I'll probably still get Distemper and the Lyme simply because ticks are bad in this state. Any recommendations besides that or does anyone have any suggestions about what else I should not be getting for her?

    I'm also SUPER stressed and frustrated because I just found out that Kira's regular veterinarian is no longer at the animal hospital that we go to!! Now what??!! :-S
    Cynthia, Proudly owned by Kira
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  • BootzBootz
    Posts: 3495
    Get the vaccines at separate times if possible!
  • I don't think I can get the vaccines separately without paying for another vet visit. Meh
    Cynthia, Proudly owned by Kira
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  • zandramezandrame
    Posts: 1106
    Kira_Kira said:

    I don't think I can get the vaccines separately without paying for another vet visit. Meh

    Just ask. We separated Kouda's vaccines and arranged with the vet to stop by later to get the extra jabs without a visit fee.

    You can also get titers to check if your dog actually needs a booster. Rabies is the only one that you need to get legally. See Dr Dodds' vaccination protocol. (Also refer to her for thyroid stuff.)
    http://drjeandoddspethealthresource.tumblr.com/post/66693331640/dodds-dog-vaccination-protocol-2013-2014

    Also, where did your preferred vet go? Might be worth it to follow them if they stayed local.
  • Thanks for the recommendation @zandrame
    The office didn't say where he went, I'm wondering if they would even tell me if I asked.

    I suppose I can ask for the blood panel and rabies to be done at the first visit then come back 2 days later for Lyme and Distemper? What do you think? Is 2 at the same time too much?

    Edit:
    Called and talked to the vet, sounded like a crazy dog mom but they told me that they would be able to do the Rabies & Distemper the first visit, bloodwork the second, and Lyme the third visit by itself since it tends to make some dogs lethargic.
    Cynthia, Proudly owned by Kira
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    “Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.”
    Post edited by Kira_Kira at 2014-09-17 17:21:13
  • Does that make 3 visits?!?! Why couldn't they do the bloodwork before giving the Lyme?!
    Post edited by lauratherose at 2014-09-17 18:56:25
  • I guess they can, not sure how I feel about having blood drawn then the Lyme. Any other input? I think I'm being overly paranoid, is all.
    Cynthia, Proudly owned by Kira
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    Kira the Cream Shiba Inu 吉良 - Facebook Page
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  • zandramezandrame
    Posts: 1106
    @Kira_Kira,
    Rabies & Distemper the first visit, bloodwork the second, and Lyme the third
    Do rabies separately. Actually, do each jab separately. I suggest: first visit do the blood draw followed by first jab (rabies or distemper). Second visit, 3-4 weeks later, second jab. Then finally the lyme if you want it. Do the blood draw FIRST to get an accurate baseline. And consider a full thyroid panel with a lab like Hemopet, since you were interested in that - general blood chemistry tests don't give you a full profile.

    How prevalent is Lyme in your area? If the infection rate is low, maybe don't bother.
    Also, vaccinated dogs can develop disease as efficacy of the product is about 60 to 70% in preventing disease, thus antibiotics must be used in vaccinated dogs developing disease, just like it must be used in non-vaccinated diseased dogs. Therefore, in general areas with a low infection rate <10% infection the vaccine should not be used as the vaccine will be of no value and may enhance disease (e.g. arthritis) directly or in some dogs that become infected. In areas where infection rates are high (>50%) then the vaccine will be very useful.
    From Dr Schultz
  • Thank you for your input and also for clarifying on the full thyroid panel, and especially on getting the blood drawn BEFORE the vaccinations. Didn't even think about that! Thanks @zandrame :)

    Lyme disease is apparently on the rise here in Virginia. At some pretty alarming rates, found an article that discussed it in detail that was published this July.

    http://www.timesdispatch.com/news/local/new-lyme-disease-estimate-cases-a-year/article_55ffcde1-2c4b-5a4c-ae24-cda6bd5575f0.html

    Based on the new CDC estimates, Virginia could have as many as 10,000 cases of Lyme disease a year instead of the approximately 1,000 cases reported to the state Health Department.

    Lyme disease, typically caused by a tick bite, has reached epidemic levels in many counties in Virginia. According to the the CDC, it is the sixth fastest-growing disease nationwide. In 2011, the CDC recorded 1,220 cases of Lyme disease in Virginia — a significant increase from 149 in 2000. But the actual number could be between eight and 10 times as high, experts say.



    I hike with Kira so I think that the Lyme vaccine might be necessary...
    Cynthia, Proudly owned by Kira
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  • RikkaRikka
    Posts: 1501
    My vet sent me a reminder that Sagan is due for his "DH-PP, 3 year vaccine" and "Bordatella" -- I'm pretty sure I'm going to opt out of Bordatella, but what is the consensus of this "3 year vaccine", DH-PP specifically? He's supposed to get these on the 23rd of this month, apparently.
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    Lauren, living with a 4 y/o Shiba named after a scientist. ☆
  • Hmmmm, that's a very good question.

    Commonly called the canine distemper vaccine, this is the most common combination vaccine given to dogs.

    The initials DHPP refer to the diseases included in the vaccine. Distemper, Hepatitis, Parvo and Parainfluenza

    Some combinations, such as DHLPP, DHLPPC, DA2LPPC, 6-Way, and 7-Way or 7-in-1, also include protection against corona virus and the bacteria leptospirosis.



    The Parvo & Parainfluenza I would think would be good to keep getting considering how deadly it can be. But is it even necessary when they aren't puppies anymore?
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  • RikkaRikka
    Posts: 1501
    Yeah, it's why I'm not entirely sure if I want to give it to him or not... He received a good amount of vaccines when he turned 1 and I think he received another one when he turned 2. I switched him to a new vet a couple of months ago, and they're aware of his vaccination past, so I don't know.
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    Lauren, living with a 4 y/o Shiba named after a scientist. ☆
  • Kira_Kira said:

    Hmmmm, that's a very good question.

    Commonly called the canine distemper vaccine, this is the most common combination vaccine given to dogs.

    The initials DHPP refer to the diseases included in the vaccine. Distemper, Hepatitis, Parvo and Parainfluenza

    Some combinations, such as DHLPP, DHLPPC, DA2LPPC, 6-Way, and 7-Way or 7-in-1, also include protection against corona virus and the bacteria leptospirosis.



    The Parvo & Parainfluenza I would think would be good to keep getting considering how deadly it can be. But is it even necessary when they aren't puppies anymore?


    titer test. If they have the antibodies in their blood, then they don't need to be revaccinated, but if they don't, they do. Last year we had a horrible outbreak of parvo here in NM and even vaccinated adult dogs were getting it (and dying). So this is one I would titer test for.

    Don't give lepto unless you are in an area where it is a problem. My Akita got very very ill from it, and I realized, later, that her breeder had told me not to vaccinate for it (she saw too many bad reactions as a vet tech). I had never asked what the L was in the DHLP vaccine they were getting, and she was in so much pain, poor girl, and her lymph nodes all swelled...it was horrible.

    Akitas are a breed known to be sensitive to vaccines, and since I've seen it in my Shibas, too, I believe all Nihon Ken are probably more or less sensitive to vaccinations. I always get mine done at different times (my vet, however, is kind enough not to charge for an office call on return visits, just the injection itself). I also follow a minimal vaccination schedule (check out Dr. Jean Dodds). I don't vaccinate my elder boy at all anymore except for rabies (required by law).

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