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Trailer for a movie documentary on Australian Dingo.
  • SayaSaya
    Posts: 6678
    Here's a trailer for this it has views from different people and it's sad a lot of Australians feel such ill will to them.

    The Dingo is vulnerable I'd hate for it to go endangered then extinct. The dingo can go from endangered to extinct in no time I think a sudden spread of disease or farmer over killing or poison and plus interbreeding with pets isn't good.

    The howling reminds me of New guinea singing dogs when they howl I do thing singers and dingo share a common ancestor in the very far past coarse they're both different.

    I'd hate for the dingo to go the way of the Thylacine or be like New guinea singing dog extinct in the wild, but in zoos, sanctuaries.

    There is a zoo in Ft. Wayne Indiana that has dingoes I believe I hope to visit it someday.

    I love dingoes of all kinds..



    Kangaroo is a issue now like deer they're getting too overpopulated and like coyotes they will come into the town.

    Hitting cars like deer which if you seen a full grown kangaroo in person they're huge! massive damage to a car.

    They do a controlled cull on the kangaroo and it's sad. :(

    I just shake my head if you stop killing the predator who is killing the dingo which eats kangaroo.

    Here's full episode on the kangaroo show I saw on pbs
    Kangaroo Mob. 49minutes or so, but interesting to watch. Very informative.

    http://video.pbs.org/video/2185855527/

    This issue with dingo reminds me so much of how people view wolves and coyotes.

    I'm not some idiot animal huger who thinks wolves, coyotes, and dingo are harmless yes they're dangerous, but so are kangaroo and deer given the situation is right.

    With farmers why not use live stock guardian dogs to deter dingoes from taking the sheep? A good live stock guardian dog is worth it's weight in gold.

    In Africa they're using them to deter cheetahs which are a predator and Vulnerable too! It's a win win the live stock guardian dogs are well taken care of and they protect their flock.

    I live in country and I don't go killing the coyotes for heck of it.

    If they cause me issue or is hurting my dog sure! They run away soon as they see me. YMMV though some coyotes are brave or used to humans thanks to people who feed cats which creates issues as the coyotes will eat the kibble and in general being so close to humans loose their fear.

    Coarse country coyotes are dangerous too.

    Farmers will hang dingos from trees which is barbaric and sad. :(

    They use poison which is disgusting as it can kill even pet dogs.

    My guess hanging the dingo is to deter others from coming over, but does it work? or am I off on why they do it?

    I mean if your going to kill something at least use the animal's pelt and skeleton. Seems like a sick waste to just hang them to rot.

    I don't think the meat would be good, but pelt is beautiful.
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    Post edited by Saya at 2012-12-03 10:34:25
  • Kobe1468Kobe1468
    Posts: 1587
    Didn't really know where to put this...

    Lots of great cognition/behavioural work with Dingoes. Hope it will, at least, change attitudes a bit.

    http://www.humananimalscience.com.au/dingo-dog-or-wolf/


    "Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened."
  • koyukikoyuki
    Posts: 1244
    There is a group (they have a facebook page) that have a dingo rescue and preservation program in place. They putyoung dingoes into pet homes, ensure they are trained and become good citizens. I enquired about adopting a dingo pup LOL but it is prohibited to own one in South Australia :-( So many dingoes are killed by people that enjoy shooting and killingthem, its heartbreaking. They are necessary - in Aus we dont have large predators other than the Dingo, so like @Saya says they assist in controlling the Kangaroo population. With the weather getting hot the roos are coming closer to high traffic areas and causing road accidents and getting themselves killed :-(

    A couple of weeks ago i came across a dead mother kangaroo (had only just died). I searched her pouch for a joey and there was a tiny tiny joey there. He died in my hands he was basically a foetus :-(
    Dingoes are super rare in South Australia as they are prohibited, but my bf is convinced he saw one out bush when he was riding his motorbike.

    I think alot of Australians have negative feelings towards Dingoes due to ignorance and lack of education etc. sad!! :-(
    Koyuki - red female
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  • zandramezandrame
    Posts: 1104
    ‘We can also conclusively say that the dingo is a distinctive Australian wild canid or member of the dog family in its own right, separate from dogs and wolves. The appropriate scientific classification is Canis dingo, as they appear not to be descended from wolves, are distinct from dogs and are not a subspecies,’ he said.

    And then...

    It is thought that dingoes were introduced to Australia between three and five thousand years ago, with genetic evidence suggesting they originate from east Asian domestic dogs.


    Sorry, what? :-?
  • Kobe1468Kobe1468
    Posts: 1587
    ^I see what you are saying.

    Here's the abstract of the study...

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jzo.12134/abstract

    "Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened."
  • sunyatasunyata
    Posts: 8429
    @Kobe1468 - I am not sure that I would ever actually believe anything from DailyMail... There have been numerous (and by numerous, I mean over half of the articles published on their site) instances of hyped up journalism from that site. Unless it can be verified from a reliable source, I would not even bother reading anything from there.
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  • Kobe1468Kobe1468
    Posts: 1587
    @sunyata ...I agree. I don't necessarily agree with the article, simply found it interesting.

    I would like to see what peers think of the study. If there is any merit to the study, it could go a long way in helping to preserve the Dingo, which is currently classified as 'vulnerable', one step up from 'endangered'.

    btw, I got the link(to the article) from one of the cognition labs I follow. They found it "interesting" as well. It was good enough to perk my interest.
    "Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened."
  • knnwangknnwang
    Posts: 644
    I have a friend whom is Australian, and I remember her telling us the Dingos’ would just kill livestock, just for the kill, one after another until all of your stock is dead. Not for food like most hunters, where after they kill one, it/they will leave the rest of the pride alone. She also said it was such a problem the government Animal Control would pay you cash for dingo scalps or dead foxes.

    Australia is home to some of the most dangerous/aggressive species.

    Found this website not sure if it is relevant http://www.burdekin.qld.gov.au/regulations-laws-and-forms/animal-management/other-animals/dingofox-bounty/
  • Kobe1468Kobe1468
    Posts: 1587
    Well, it seems as though the Dingo is now a species, rather than a subspecies. Again, think this is great for the Dingo, as it has been declining in numbers.

    Would love to see what our Australian members think of this new classification. How is it being received by Australians? Do they feel it's correct?

    http://sydney.edu.au/news/84.html?newsstoryid=13282
    "Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened."
  • knnwang said:

    I have a friend whom is Australian, and I remember her telling us the Dingos’ would just kill livestock, just for the kill, one after another until all of your stock is dead. Not for food like most hunters, where after they kill one, it/they will leave the rest of the pride alone. She also said it was such a problem the government Animal Control would pay you cash for dingo scalps or dead foxes.

    Australia is home to some of the most dangerous/aggressive species.

    Found this website not sure if it is relevant http://www.burdekin.qld.gov.au/regulations-laws-and-forms/animal-management/other-animals/dingofox-bounty/



    Re: killing just to kill....I'm not convinced. People here in the US swear that coyotes do that. Some others swear that wolves do that. And of course, I've heard people say that about foxes in England too, but in all cases....I'm dubious. I imagine there may be cases when it has happened, but it's more likely that a domestic dog would do that rather than a wild canine.
  • koyukikoyuki
    Posts: 1244
    I think that Australian farmers tend to humanise the Dingo- as if they are serial killers that attack just for the sake of it, which is not what i believe. There are so many 'country' people (non farmers aswell) that believe they have the right and the need to shoot and kill Dingo. I remember seeing a photo someone posted on facebook (again, not a farmer so definately had no reason to kill) of about 6 Dingo pups that he shot. He found them drinking from a creek and he killed them all. Not saying farmers have a reason to kill them, but i guess if they feel they are atleast shooting them to protect their livestock.
    I remember reading somewhere about a widespread poisoning using a substance '1080' or something of the like, another Aussie member from here had it on facebook.
    Koyuki - red female
    Takeo- cream male
    Kenji- black and tan male
    Suma- sesame female
    Haruki-brindle Japanese Akita Inu
  • niki82niki82
    Posts: 434
    Dingoes do not kill just to kill. Apparently they enjoy the liver/kidneys and will take down a sheep and eat out the organs. Now I am not convinced they waste the rest of the sheep as more often then not they are disturbed during the kill and have to leave so they are not shot. Now the majority of the dogs killing the livestock in Australia are in fact feral dogs not dingos. Perhaps some of the feral dogs have some dingo DNA but barely. I have worked with dingo hybrids and pure blood dingos and they behave nothing like a typical domestic dog because they are not domestic. What they are however is amazing highly intelligent predators and if they keep killing them Australia's native wildlife will perish from the foxes feral cats and dogs killing them all. Australia needs the dingo. Now perhaps the dingo didn't originate in Australia but it has been here for around 5 thousand years and adjusted to the continent and is now (or was) in sync with Australia's environment. For all intents and purposes it is native. Some dingoes also live in family structures and when idiots kill the adults it leaves behind juveniles without the support and teachings that they need to survive correctly so are left to fend for themselves. Sometimes babies are found in dens/hollow trees by so called well meaning people who think they can raise them as a domestic dog.... Well once the dingo baby is a bit older and out of control it is either put down or dumped at the pound. There are excellent dingo preservations who will take a dingo in if their DNA is above 80% dingo and they do an excellent job preserving the breed and educating the public and as KOYUKI said they will let people home pups. These potential dingo parents are screened and must have correct sized pens with roofs as dingos are excellent climbers. Dingos are naturally suspicious of humans (as they should be) but they are so loyal and great companions if housed with someone who understands the dingo nature and doesn't try to treat them like a domestic dog. Sorry for the rant but I absolutely adore dingos and am a strong advocator of them. Australia needs to wake up and stop killing its native animals.

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