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Food aggression just going away?
  • I hope this is in the right category. I have not gotten a Shiba yet :( but we did decide to rescue a shelter dog. He is a Black Lab/Chow mix according to the shelter. Anyway when we first brought him home he would mess in the house, growl whenever we tried to move him from furniture and had food aggression. He bit my mother in law when she tried to take a piece of raw chicken he had gotten out of the trash. It was a pretty deep puncture. He wasn't eating back then though. I don't know what it was but he would go 2 days at a time without eating so I wonder if that was part of the reason. Anyway before I could get him into the vet he started to eat again and doesn't growl anymore. He will usually drop something I tell him to, but the other night he didn't and he let my husband take it out of his mouth. He doesn't growl anymore when I put something like a broom near his food and push it away ( tell you the truth I'm kind of scared to use my hand haha).

    I also saw a photo of the day we adopted him on the rescue and his eyes are a lot calmer now. He Had those hyper/stressed eyes in the photo. I guess I'm just wondering of this is normal for shelter dogs. I've hard Shibas can resource guard soon was hoping someone on this forum may know something about it. Hopefully no one minds me posting about a totally unrelated breed! I do have a 2 year old so I have to be careful but he is the sweetest dog. All he does now is lay around and sleep haha. My mother in law wants to get rid of him but I want to give him another shot. I mean we adopted him and I don't want him to be bounced around everywhere. He is a 6 year old big black dog and those are some of the last to find homes. That's why we got him. Getting rid of him is pretty much not an option to me but I just want to know if this is normal.
  • Well, I know we had to work on our dog's resource guarding in order to get it to go away (which was actually pretty easy, on took a week or two) but I do know that dogs in shelters are often super stressed and can appear to have problems that they don't really have in homes due to that stress. In your case, I would keep working on the "drop it"/trading command just in case but I would think that it's possible that he's stopped resource guarding his food now because now he knows he'll be fed all the time instead of having to wonder about it.
  • I agree. He knows food will be available so it isn't as stressful now. New environment, new tasty chicken piece someone I didn't really know trying to take it from me, I would guard and potentially bite too. Some dogs have had to respond that way to be sure they get anything to eat but it can be an unlearned behavior when they figure out you're not going to let them starve. Bringing a new dog into the house may trigger this response again, be aware of that and a shiba may not back down in a scuffle. When I brought a rescue shiba into my home he would try to take my girls food. Correction, redirection, and setting them up to be successful instead of waiting for them to react had helped us a lot. I used to feed my boy in his kennel, then gradually we made baby steps to the point where they can eat side by side now with no issues. Good luck. My rescue boy bit me after the first week and now I don't think he would stand for anyone biting me without trying to take them out. Change is hard on them, give your baby a chance, positively reinforce situations and set him up to be successful and he will. Good luck!
  • Thanks (: giving him up is not an option. I'm just worried about my 2 year old but Im teaching her not to pet doggies that are eating. I don't think it's going to be a problem since he doesn't seem to care anymore as long as their supervised when together. It should be like that anyway. I can't get over how his eyes have softened up. He's a big baby now haha. He was supposed to be my husbands dog but he seems more taken with me :p


  • BootzBootz
    Posts: 3485
    Make sure if he starts to growl again that you calm him down and make him feel ok. Some owners think that saying NO and hitting nose and what not, is a good way to train them to stop. BUT what they are actually doing is training the dog not to growl, which is their warning before the "attack" and they just attack without warning. I hope that makes sense. Lol
  • SayaSaya
    Posts: 6678
    That's good he hasn't shown anymore guarding.

    This book should be still helpful to read and maybe it'll have something to help prevent a issue and get him to a point he's good and he'll give up something high value like a raw chicken bone..

    http://www.amazon.com/Mine-Practical-Guide-Resource-Guarding/dp/0970562942/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1328913609&sr=8-3

    Raw gets a bad rap some thing it turns dogs into blood thirsty animals. It's a higher valued item much more then kibble so to a dog it's like gold to them and they fear they'll loose it.

    Cooked items can cause same response or even caned dog food.

    Bella my mom's boxer had resource guarding issues used to get tense during eating kibble. It was mostly because she was fed in same room as Dink.. :\

    Dink went and pushed her away from food to get her puppy food so I think that caused her to be more guarded with us.

    She eventually got better when we separated them during feeding Dink in mud room with door shut.

    She used resource guard wet dog food mostly.

    It took time, but she is better.

    I hope things continue to do well.

    Photobucket
    Nicole, 5year old Bella(Boxer), and 4year old Saya(Shiba inu)
  • thanks everyone! I'm still going to be cautious, but I really do think he was just unsure. I also used to believe in the whole dominance training methods until I visited some of the links on this forum and did some research. I have thrown that theory out of my mind and I can tell a difference with my dog. I think that may have had something to do with it to. I am continuing with the drop it command and he is doing great! Now I just have to break it to my mother in law that we are keeping him :/ She lives with us, and thinks that if a dog bites a human, they are going to like the blood or something and be aggressive to people.

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