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Dog park people -_-
  • sunyatasunyata
    Posts: 8583
    @BanjoTheBetaDog - Unfortunately with public parks, unless the people or their dog are actively breaking posted rules or local laws, they have just as much right to be there as anyone else. That being said, it does not necessarily mean that they SHOULD be there, but it is something to keep in mind.

    You might want to try to approach the topic in a different manner. Maybe strike up a friendly casual conversation about canine behaviour and how much you yourself have learned over the past year about how to read your dog's body language and how to manage your dog in less than ideal situations. Maybe point out some questionable body language that her dogs (or other dogs) are giving off.

    If she seems interested (which is kind of a long shot), then maybe explain to her why resources such as toys and food are not the best idea at a dog park, especially when there are unknown personalities around that might cause problems.

    But, like the issue with the chows, if it becomes a bigger problem or something that you just do not want to involve Banjo in, then avoidance is probably a good answer. Dog parks are not necessary and, in my experience, can often cause way more problems than they solve. So while it is good for Banjo to play with other well-behaved dogs and socialize in an off-leash setting, it is not the end-all to dog-dog and dog-people socialization.

    Another solution is to find a private, membership only dog park. These are often harder to find, but it might be a better solution than no dog park at all.
    Bella 2Mountains 2Nola 2
    Casey, with Bella and Nola, hanging out in the mountains of Virginia.
    I Wander, I Ride
  • chradekchradek
    Posts: 69
    As a new forum member, I must say this post has been quite educational to read! I had no idea that there could be so many issues with simply going to a dog park. It sounds an awful lot like taking your children to the playground, which can be more stressful than enjoyable if the wrong personalities are there. O.o So now I feel that I will either be completely annoyed by other people there, or else I'll be being judged and looked down on by those that know better and have no patience for my "newbie" mistakes. I've owned plenty of dogs, but never took any to the dog park. After reading this thread, I think I will just continue that trend! LOL

    I do appreciate that some of you posted positive encounters though! (Not to bash anyone that was being negative - I totally understand the desire to vent in a group of trusted, like-minded folks). I could probably do the same thing in a "playground personalities" thread. ;-)

    I'm sure I will one day venture out and see for myself what my local DP is like....but I will definitely do so with some serious trepidation! Yikes!
  • @Sunyata, as you know Banjo goes out every day for socialization with his trainer. If I never step foot in a dog park again, I know that Banjo will still be more than adequately socialized. The problem is I can't find a place for him and I to play fetch!!! Until now... I googled members only dog parks and sure enough I will be checking some out this weekend in NJ! Thanks for the heads up! I didn't even know they existed. (and now I can update the crazy dog owner traits I exhibit. I cancelled my golf club membership on account of wanting to spend time with Banjo (which REALLY made my golf buddies upset), and now I am considering a canine club instead??

    =)

    @chradek, I'm glad you see dog parks can be good places too. Please don't let this thread scare you. Like everything, its all about the experience. We go to the park pretty often and it's usually good, but I make it a point to know the dogs that are there and how they behave. I know Banjo will be a good boy (or an indifferent boy) and if the other dogs aren't in the same mindset we leave. Just read up on canine body language and you'll know when you should run or stay.


  • CrystalWolfCrystalWolf
    Posts: 235
    The dog park riku and i frequent is membership of sorts. There is a code you have to enter to enter and exit. in order to get the membership your dog has to have proof of rabies vaccinations, and pay a fee of 25$ a yr which is very doable. riku and i go every day of the week.

    Even the membership doesnt stop a few weirdos from entering but there are not very many. I have gotten to know the people that visit at the times that I'm there and its nice riku can socialize and so can I. there are people that bring balls and play fetch with their dogs, however I ask if they are possesive over it b/c riku will chase after the dog, but not the ball. Most of the people will not play fetch while we are there if their dog is possesive. I have been lucky with the park in our area. It also doesnt allow kids younger than 13.

    I have had all posative experiances at the park, and as a side note froma previous post riku now gets along with hershey the chocolate lab he wanted to bully before so thats nice as well.
  • FuyutsukiFuyutsuki
    Posts: 62
    I would approach is asking instead of informing. Simply saying "Please don't throw the ball in the park while my dog is here, he is very toy protective and I don't want him to cause any trouble". It's a bit different than telling her not to do so and provides a reason.
  • FuyutsukiFuyutsuki
    Posts: 62
    Also, Fuyu has been going to a new park with lots of bigger dogs. My new favorite is all the owners who are scared that their dogs are going to hurt Fuyu, but the minute they turn their back Fuyu is instigating another play session with their giant dog.
  • RikkaRikka
    Posts: 1501
    I then have 5 dogs jumping and nipping at my hands while I go give it back to the woman. I calmly said "you shouldn't throw a ball in a park, all of the dogs will fight over it" She laughs and says "oh, its ok" and THROWS IT AGAIN. Banjo goes to try to greet her mini-pit and the dog was frozen stiff and growling and tried to snip at banjo and the other dogs


    You have no idea how many dogs have either growled or even attacked Sagan for being curious in their toys (or them holding the toy in their mouth)... There's never any reasoning with people who bring toys to the dog parks and obliviously throw it around--I don't think they realize that toy / resource guarding exists and is a thing that can be nasty to manage.

    I think you did good that you left after that happened, but personally, there's not much you can do than either informing them or leaving.

    Personally, whenever I see the guy who thinks they're alone (you know, the type that brings the stick and throws the ball for their Lab) with the toy and their dog, I avoid them like the plague. It never goes over well, especially if your dog "wins" the contest of sprinting to get it. Sagan is the type that once he grabs a toy that the other dog wants, he runs around like a madman, playing a game. I've had people legitimately angry at me that they can't get their ball back because Sagan grabbed it. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
    image
    Lauren, living with a 4 y/o Shiba named after a scientist. ☆
    Post edited by Rikka at 2014-06-10 23:31:49
  • GemmaGemma
    Posts: 103
    @BanjoTheBetaDog any local boarding kennels round by you with a closed of field you could play fetch in? :) I work part time at a boarding kennel and get to take Laika with me to play with the other dogs if we let some out into the field. Out of hours (with my bosses permission of course) we use the field for playing fetch, obedience training and agility :) If there's a local boarding kennel, chances are they have a large fenced off area that isn't used for some of the time. Maybe ring around some places and see if you could pop down every so often? That way he get's the freedom of being in a secure area with no unruly pooches coming to bother you ;)
  • NASANASA
    Posts: 189
    I've had people legitimately angry at me that they can't get their ball back because Sagan grabbed it. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯


    Happens at the DP all the time. My older pup will drop whatever it is when I tell him to. My younger one gets toy possessive and will fight over a ball or take it and run clear across the field. I just laugh and get it back from them, once i finally catch them.

    Im working on teaching the younger one to drop it. Were so so there.

    I agree sometimes you actually have to walk away and just leave.

    I never thought about people NOT bringing toys to the dog park. I think in the next DP meeting, I may bring that up. Soo many fights start just because of a toy. LOL or maybe I should just post unofficial signs NO DOG TOYS ALLOWED.
  • kiba888kiba888
    Posts: 144
    Just a tip, I take Kiba to dog parks in cities that are affluent. Reasoning is that the owners in the area are more likely to have well-behaved dogs.

    There is a big difference is the number of incidents Kiba gets involved in now that he goes to better dog parks.
  • Kiba, I live in a pretty affluent area (my lonely little SUV is parked between a ferrari 458 and a Porsche Panamera).... based on that logic, I'd hate to see what the DP is like "up the hill" =)

  • kiba888kiba888
    Posts: 144
    @banjorthebetadog -- Let's just say I've had owners that don't do anything when their dogs get aggressive. I had to separate dogs myself and get bit in the process (though I didn't know I was bit until I saw blood all over my clothes). There are dogs that just shouldn't be at dog parks, and there are noob owners who don't know what to do when their dogs get into fights. They just put their hands over the mouths and say "omg" and watch it all unfold.

    extremely frustrating.
  • shibamistressshibamistress
    Posts: 5171
    Since I don't take my dogs to dog parks--too many clueless people for me!--I mostly just read and am glad I'm not having to deal with this.

    but I thought of this thread when I talked to my vet recently, as she was telling me to avoid our local dog park. I didn't even know we had a local dog park (ie. up here in the mountains vs. in Albuquerque), until she told me. Apparently it's new, and apparently the most recent problem has not been other dogs, but rattlesnakes. 3-4 were sighted in the dog park in just one month, and one dog did get bit. :( So, yeah, another reason for me not to go! (Though as some forum members here know, I had two dogs struck by rattlesnakes in my own yard, so it's not like not going to the dog park is going to help me avoid them!)
  • I didn't even mention about a week ago the banjo-mobile (the Sedan I purchased just for our little trips) was totaled at the dog park. Some idiot came flying around the corner and slammed it. We were in the park playing and no one was hurt but it was totaled. It's for the best as I am not saddled with insurance and parking for it, but the more I read the more I think he and I need to move to a ranch in the middle of nowhere.
  • NASANASA
    Posts: 189
    kiba888 said:

    Just a tip, I take Kiba to dog parks in cities that are affluent. Reasoning is that the owners in the area are more likely to have well-behaved dogs.

    There is a big difference is the number of incidents Kiba gets involved in now that he goes to better dog parks.



    For some reason in this area it's the exact opposite the affluent owners are very "babying" with their dogs. They have dogs that are in a carrier up until they get in a DP. Have specialized toys water bottles .

    Now the less kept parks are owners who are new and less protective and will allow my pups to "terrorize" their dogs.
  • kiba888kiba888
    Posts: 144
    I have a strong dislike of owners who have dogs that don't play, but just follow and hover near their owners. These dogs are the worst with aggression; they attack any dog that goes near the owner.
  • chradekchradek
    Posts: 69
    @BanjoTheBetaDog Jeez! So glad you guys were in the park and not the car! That's crazy!
  • FuyutsukiFuyutsuki
    Posts: 62
    My main goal at the dog park is to stay out of Fuyu's way. This is his space, and he can choose to play however and with whomever he chooses. I dictate enough fun in his life, I'll let him have this one ;)


    "Sagan is the type that once he grabs a toy that the other dog wants, he runs around like a madman, playing a game. I've had people legitimately angry at me that they can't get their ball back because Sagan grabbed it. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯"

    This made me laugh so hard. The perfect emoticon for that situation.
  • BootzBootz
    Posts: 3495
    @kiba888 :( my Jackie is like that. She guards me when we are at dog parks, so i normally walk around the park to avoid any scruffles. She mainly growl barks + lunges, but she never bites.

    I bring her because of Bootz. When I bring Jackie, Bootz doesn't have to worry about it and runs off playing with other dogs or just lounge around. If Jackie isn't there, Bootz sticks close to me to protect me vs off doing her own thing.

  • Kobe1468Kobe1468
    Posts: 1587
    Pretty good article from Dr Yin....

    http://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/dog-park-etiquette-rules

    I've now had three trips to the dog park(yes, a small sample), and have had no bad results. But I do think having some general knowledge of dog behaviour(all dogs, not just your own) helps to avoid any possible conflicts. Reading another dogs behaviour can be just, or more, important than your own dogs behaviour!


    "Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened."
  • JuniJuni
    Posts: 1269
    There is a big dog park outside Stockholm, at the royal castle, I've probably mentioned it before, but it is like two islands connected with a bridge and surrounded by a Canal or a moat if you like. Juni hasn't realized the canal freezes in the winter so she could easily take off.
    Anyways, since it is the royal castle there are lots of tourists there and some mistake this for a picnic area or just go for a stroll or take their kids to play in the area. Some even seem to go in there to pet random dogs as part of the sight seeing...There are "warning signs" but I believe only in Swedish so it is not that easy to understand for everybody.
  • RooneyRooney
    Posts: 142
    Kobe1468 said:

    Pretty good article from Dr Yin....

    http://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/dog-park-etiquette-rules

    I've now had three trips to the dog park(yes, a small sample), and have had no bad results. But I do think having some general knowledge of dog behaviour(all dogs, not just your own) helps to avoid any possible conflicts. Reading another dogs behaviour can be just, or more, important than your own dogs behaviour!




    I actually disagree with pretty much this entire article. Teach your dog not to steal toys! PFFF as if. More like don't bring your dog's toys to the park if you/your dog isn't good at sharing.

    They just fenced in part of a local park (about an acre). It's really close to my house, but I don't think I like the people who go there as much as our regular park. I think because it's new, all the crazies in the neighborhood have come out of the woodwork. For instance, this one woman came with her friend. The woman's dog was in her arms and barking from outside the fence. I'm not sure who was more scared the lady or her dog. Despite that, she brought him in the park then proceeded to freak out any time another dog got near hers. Just stay home woman!

    I think I'm going to stop going there and only take Rooney to our previous park, which he likes more anyway.

    Also, a big THANK YOU to the posters on this thread who have helped me improve my own etiquette at the park. :)
    Allison, Rooney's Mom
    Post edited by Rooney at 2014-10-23 18:29:03
  • RooneyRooney
    Posts: 142
    I realize I'm the last person who posted here, but I have to share a story from the park yesterday. This woman came into the park right after me and thought my dog was some other female Shiba, so she asked if I was the person who was going to breed my dog with her son's Shiba.

    I pretty much lost my $h!t on her. I told her how irresponsible it would be for her son to breed his Shiba to anyone else's dog, even if his vet recommended he do so because it's such a great example of the breed. I pointed out that responsible breeders do extensive testing on their dogs and have the records for said testing from their dog's parents as well and would also need to pay for shots for puppies and provide a health guarantee for the puppies. Without knowing if his dog is a carrier for any of the genetic issues Shibas can have, he'd be setting himself up for some hefty vet bills on returned pups. Plus, he has no idea how to screen potential pet homes that are prepared for a Shiba, which will just mean more of them in rescues/shelters. That's a lot of responsibility for someone just looking to breed his dog because it's "pretty/handsome" and as a parent, it's her job to discourage him from making such a terrible decision. I might have also suggested that her son's vet was an idiot and that he should find a new one.

    If this makes me one of the evil dog park people now, I don't care (although, I did almost feel bad when her eyes were bulging from her head in shock). After seeing the negative results of a BYB first hand, I REALLY don't want to encourage anyone else to become one. :-S
    Allison, Rooney's Mom
  • Kobe1468Kobe1468
    Posts: 1587
    @Rooney...I'd love to hear why you disagree with Dr. Yin's article on dog park etiquette. You gave one example(about toys). I won't argue that one, as I don't think toys should be allowed in dog parks(at least the smaller ones).

    Do you disagree when she says you shouldn't allow your dog to rush other dogs entering the park? Is it polite to allow your dog to jump on people? Is it appropriate to ignore your dog?

    Just found it interesting that you would disagree with "pretty much this entire article". Dr Yin's points are well laid out, tried and tested(by Dr. Yin herself). She even shares a run in she and her own dogs experienced.

    I'm sorry for your negative experiences at dog parks. Your most recent one was very alarming and I'm glad you tried to educate her on responsible breeding. Good on you!
    "Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened."
  • RooneyRooney
    Posts: 142
    @Kobe1468 I went through and broke it down more. I think the parts I didn't like really skewed my perception at first. Here's how I would break it down:

    Like/Agree:
    - Intro: When the guy didn’t listen to her about her dog’s reactivity, I completely agree with her decision to leave the park.
    - Scenario 1: Agreed, but at the same time, it’s sometimes hard to control. I would say though that the most important part is paying attention to both the dog doing the rushing and the one being rushed to anticipate issues. Also, try to stay close enough to intervene if problems arise.
    - Scenario 4: Yes, do keep your dog from getting over excited. Pay attention to the body language of both your and their dog so that you can distract or engage your dog in other activities if it’s pestering a pooch that doesn’t want the attention.
    - Scenario 5: While I don’t agree with the main premise, I do agree with the underlying idea that you should not let your dog pester dogs that don’t want your dog’s attention.
    - Scenario 6: Yes, you should train your dog to respect people’s space and greet them politely. If not, please at least apologize when your dog body slams someone.
    - Scenario 7: Out of all her points, I agree with this one the most. Do not ignore your dog. Be vigilant and stay close enough to step in if there are problems. I’ve had to walk away from many a dog park conversation because my dog started to wonder in another direction and the person I was talking to always understood.
    - Anti-menace: The last box doesn’t start off well, focusing on playing with just the owner again, but she wraps it up positively by saying that the dog can play with other dogs so long as they’re both relaxed and having fun.

    Dislike/Disagree:
    - Intro: Given that some dogs are leash reactive, I really don’t believe she should have had her Corgi on a leash in the park. I can understand to some degree since it was originally just her and her two dogs initially in the park, but it’s still setting up a potential bad situation.
    - Scenario 2: Do not bring toys to the park that you/your dog are not willing to share. Especially do not bring it if it is a high value toy that your dog might start a fight over.
    - Scenario 5: As other people have noted in this same string, it’s often an issue when people want to bring their dogs to the dog park exclusively to play with the owner rather than other dogs. If you can’t adapt to not having your dog’s full attention, then you may want to find alternate locations or come at times when the park will likely be empty.
    - Anti-menace: Her tip is to train your dog not to play with the other dogs at the park and only focus on you. I think part of going to the park is to help your dog learn how to play with other dogs, not just it's owner.
    - Anti-menace: Train to come when called – I have a Shiba and recall is not his strong suit. I address this by being close enough to step in if necessary.
    - Anti-menace: 3rd picture down shows the owner giving her dog a treat in the dog park. Big No-No unless you want to get mobbed by the other dogs there. Easiest way to end up the center of every dog’s attention, display that you have treats.

    Ambivalent:
    - Scenario 3: Barking for attention. I don’t agree or disagree with this point. However, I have seen other people’s dogs engage in this behavior at the park without any negative consequences. The times I’ve seen it, the dogs were playing in a pack under owner supervision. Usually another dog would then engage the dog barking, thus bringing him into the pack/play.
    Allison, Rooney's Mom
  • dagnydagny
    Posts: 9
    We go to a pretty awesome dog park. Everyone is nice and the dogs play well. I've never seen any of this talked about humping going on. And Dagny is a favorite.

    This one man, however, insists he can make our "yellow dog" like him. He is in fact traumatizing my dachshund by following him around.

    Dagny's only issue is she likes to book it in the woods area and I panic when I can't see her even though it's all gated. Oh, and there was an incident with a Yorkie puppy that she thought was prey. :/ Every dog is fine, but that Yorkie did in fact look like a rodent. I'm still not sure why a timid four pound dog was left to roam the big dog section. :/ We bring Dagny to the big dog section because she's a rough player.

    Post edited by dagny at 2014-11-10 14:33:11
  • Kobe1468Kobe1468
    Posts: 1587
    @Rooney...Thank you! I think you did a good job analyzing the article. Maybe more constructive than just ranting about dog parks( not referring to you or anybody here, for that matter).

    I guess I don't have a problem with people who play with their own dogs, especially if they go during off peak hours, and respect others who are there for the social aspect.

    Regarding recall, it's an owners responsibility to control their dogs at all times. A good recall, teamed with an owner who can(even minimally) read behaviour/body posture can go a long way in avoiding conflict. This is another reason why I don't have a problem with owners who can play with their own dog. It's a good exercise on focus in a sometimes hectic and distracting environment.

    I do agree that giving a treat isn't a good idea. There are other ways to reward focus and good behaviour.

    As far as her dog on a leash, it was during off peak hours at a multi use park. The Corgi was not only reactive, but also fearful. Her other dog, who was off leash, was reactive to unfamiliar dogs. In this scenario, I think she was being as responsible as she could be. I wouldn't suggest an inexperienced owner try it, but let's take it into perspective... It's Dr Yin!
    "Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened."
  • RooneyRooney
    Posts: 142
    @Kobe1468 I didn't mean to imply that an owner should not play with their dog. There is nothing wrong with that and I think you're right it can help recall, but it's also a dog park too, so the owner should be okay for the dog to want to spend part of the time playing with dogs too.
    Allison, Rooney's Mom
  • So another rant to add to the pile. Most of the parks have extra wide maintenance gates for lawnmowers and such and mostly they are locked shut. Went to local park that has nice sally ports to keep door-bolters from getting out and watched in horror as lazy people HELD OPEN the unlocked maintenance gates to call their UNLEASHED DOGS to come into to area. Then most of them proceeded to walk through the area, which is the small dog area, with their large dog and open the other unlocked maintenance gate into the large dog section. WTF people. Called the parks and rec department for the city and left a message about the unlocked gates, but am planning on adding some zip ties to dog bag in case it happens again at this park.
  • AnjyilAnjyil
    Posts: 776
    Wow, this is a gold mine of advice! We are planning to take Coal to a dog park after we get his rabies shots and him fixed. Japan laws say that all rabies shots are given in April, so it is pointless to try and get it now because, by law, we would have to go again in April anyways. Also, dog parks here won't accept any dogs under six months (at least, the ones we find say so).

    It will be interesting to see how many of these traits hold true in another country. Actually, in our area, we were only able to find one or two dog parks nearby (that is, within an hours drive). It is not yet a big thing here. I don't even know how many people go to them. Just by the fact that they are scarce, it may well be crowded :/ We'll find out this May or so!
  • There are always abandoned (public?) toys lying around at our favorite dog park. I've tried to toss the random ball I inevitably find for Ichabod, but he doesn't have a lot of interest after maybe one round of fetch ("Dad, look, other dogs!"). Nobody else cares about them either.
    Never seen any issues; so maybe the dogs don't get possessive over the unclaimed toys precisely because they've never had a chance to get attached to them. Or maybe owners of toy-possessive dogs just avoid the place (which suits us just fine). Or maybe sad, sunfaded tennis balls are universally low-value resources.
  • spacedogsspacedogs
    Posts: 361
    JackState said:

    Or maybe sad, sunfaded tennis balls are universally low-value resources.



    Any tennis ball that has some fuzz, no matter how old or gross or pilled it might be, is of the utmost interest to Laika, who will take said ball and settle down with it held firmly between her paws and proceed to tear all the fuzz off of it.

    Every tennis ball.


    Every single one of them.


    I don't buy tennis balls any more. =))

    (dog park ones only interest her if there are no dogs around thankfully omg)
  • JackStateJackState
    Posts: 131
    spacedogs said:


    Any tennis ball that has some fuzz, no matter how old or gross or pilled it might be, is of the utmost interest to Laika, who will take said ball and settle down with it held firmly between her paws and proceed to tear all the fuzz off of it.

    Every tennis ball.


    Every single one of them.



    Nothing like turds with flecks of sickly neon yellow. Except for after Ichabod raids the wastebasket (now upgraded to a lid) for delicious used cuetips.

    Now with Ichabod it's a toss up on whether he'll detach the layer of fuzz first or open of the seams of the ball itself.
  • spacedogsspacedogs
    Posts: 361
    JackState said:


    Now with Ichabod it's a toss up on whether he'll detach the layer of fuzz first or open of the seams of the ball itself.



    Yep, Laika does this with all the cheaper balls. I intentionally sought out professional tennis balls once for a little extra $$. On the plus side they are still around and in one piece, on the down side they have big bald spots and I feel like replacing them is not the type of dog treat I want to buy for the money lol.

    And the qtips .. our dogs (yep both of them) favorite past time is cleaning daddy's ears. He doesn't complain, he used to always get wax build up but since we got a Shiba (now x2) his qtip usage and ear wax have greatly reduced! Probably a little gross and definitely not on topic of dog parks but anecdotal to the cuetip comment hahaha!
  • JackStateJackState
    Posts: 131
    Weekend before last we took Ichabod to the dog park, and he had a pretty good time until the heat started getting brutal. Near the end though this bus full of folks from the local megachurch (said their matching t-shirts) showed up and just kinda hung out at the dog park for about 15 minutes. Without dogs. No big deal, they were respectful about asking to pet dogs that went up to them; but neither the kids nor the adults with them understood the airlock protocol for entering/exiting the dog area. As we were leaving they asked if we would like this little baggie of treats--multicolored milkbone knockoffs, a folded [church name] info sheet, and a little blueberry muffin lookin' like it & eleven more came from Walmart. I'm not feeding my dog a damned sugary blueberry muffin, folks. I take him to the dog park to wear him out, not to wire him!

    image

  • AnjyilAnjyil
    Posts: 776
    @JackState one of the best parts about living in Japan is we don't get that kind of stuff almost ever. Though free treats aren't so bad, and I am sure blueberry muffins are human food, too XD
  • JackStateJackState
    Posts: 131
    Oh they did say the bag was for the dog. Maybe she forgot she snuck a human treat in there too haha.

    Also it was a step-van, not a bus. The bus was from a similar incident last year. Some folks were on the way to see a play or something (theatre and art museum right by there) just pulled over and the people got out to play with people's dogs--which Ichabod is all about.
  • LilikoiLilikoi
    Posts: 1267
    That sounds totally annoying to me lol. I don't really care if they're polite, no need to all flock a dog park when you don't have any dogs and potentially stress out the dogs there. Go to a regular park. And I wouldn't accept any free treats in a random baggy lolol. I'm cautious about what i let Ozzy eat, but even if it looked like something I feed him myself, at best I would accept it not wanting to offend them and would toss it in the garbage at home. :P I bet they'd be unhappy if a bus full of random people brought a bunch of dogs to their church unexpectedly. :))
  • ZenkiZenki
    Posts: 396
    I will confess the following things i have done...
    1.) i was the guy that brought starbucks iced beverage in the dog park because it was like 90 degrees out there. Never food though if that makes it better. ;))
    2.) i was the dogless guy that visited dog parks. When i knew i was getting Zenki but still had to wait weeks before i can take him home, i checked out the 3 closest dog parks near my home just to get the lay of the land. Asked a couple of people how their experiences have been in those parks. Oh i didn't have treats in my pocket. :))

    as far as my experiences go...
    1.) my breeder has always told me and still telling me to just avoid dog parks altogether. She thinks that it only takes one very serious incident to have a 'ruined' dog, i.e. physically or emotionally. i think same holds true when walking on sidewalks or trails doesn't mean you should stop doing that as well.
    2.) With the months of walking i have done with my dog, i can tell he is very interested in interacting with other dogs. he's very positive, playful, and energetic around other dogs during our leashed walks. I just feel that it would be a shame to deny my dog that freedom to play with dogs untethered, unbound, and unleashed.
    3.) if memory serves me well, Zenki has been harassed in dog parks 3-5 times where i really saw he was distressed. And it's always by getting ganged by multiple bigger dogs and chased out of the park. He was never attacked (biting, gnarling) by one or more dogs. He has been snapped at but he usually shrugs those off.
    4.) Zenki has shown aggression to other dogs 3 times. and it's always when he has grabbed hold of a ball and dogs are around him. i don't even see other dogs were trying to take the ball. and it's not always immediate. from my perspective, it looks like he struts around with the ball in his mouth being all proud that he has the ball. i see him being the one walking towards other dogs and when the other dogs show interest that's when he gets aggressive.
    5.) I still take him to dog parks because he's like the most well socialized dog in the park up until he spots a ball being thrown or played with and he manages to grab hold of the ball. I just try to manage this by avoiding those people playing with toys and their dogs in the dog park. and when Zenki does manage to grab a ball, i try to explain the situation with the other person. i then proceed to corral Zenki so i can take the ball. I play with him with the ball for a couple of minutes then return the ball to the person playing with it. then i leave the park because at that point, i know Zenki is on alert guard mode. so instead of waiting for him to actually show aggression like he has in the past. i just manage the situation and leave immediately. in my mind, i lose the right to be in the park once my dog has shown aggression or if i feel he's about to. I can only hope that when i'm in the park, other people there would act the same. unfortunately there's a lot of daft dog owners out there.

    in conclusion, i will continue to go to dog parks. it just gives me great joy to see my dog running freely and clearly enjoying the rough and tumble of playing with actual dogs. i can play with him as long and as energetically as i can manage and it would still not be the same as actual dogplay. I would also recommend dog parks to other people. but PLEASE know your dog. be ready to step in to rescue your dog or another dog from yours. It's not free time for you where you can just drop off your dog and then check out. if you want that then pay for daycare services. There are tons of idiots out there so let's set ourselves apart.

    Sorry for the long post...

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    Black, Tan and Awesome
    Instagram: @ShibaZenki

    “Don't accept your dog's admiration as conclusive evidence that you are wonderful.”
    – Ann Landers

    Post edited by Zenki at 2017-07-26 16:53:25
  • AnjyilAnjyil
    Posts: 776
    I think I understand what you mean, @Zenki

    Coal really wants to meet other dogs, too, and I want him to as well---but I am very picky about what dogs he interacts with. I don't want him to be around dogs that will encourage bad behavior and social taboos in the canine world. I am trying to find well behaved dogs to socialize him with and work on setting up play dates at the park or at the dog run (they call it a dog run here)

    On the plus side, we usually end up going to the dog run when there are no dogs. We have to try really hard to get there at a time that has dogs, so we can still take him. Taking him to a controlled environment like the training class really seems to have helped, too, as he gets exposure to being near dogs without the interaction--learning impulse control. Unfortunately, the beginner dogs have some questionable attitudes, so I keep my distance. Coal is kind of strong and he could totally rip his leash out of my hands if he really tried.

    I wish I could say there were well socialized dogs at our dog run, but sadly...that has not been the case. I have been thinking about driving up to the nearest rest area on the high way that has a dog run and trying my luck there. We had good results the first three times.

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